Does self-tracking increase the healthicization of everyday life?

Some years ago I have suggested to think life-style centred health promotion as phenomenon that mirrors the regimen designed to manage chronic illness (matching the chronic patient with a chronic proto-patient), and therefore call it “chronic health”. Although I have tried to understand this a temporal delimitation of the Parsonsian sick role, I have not paid much attention to the temporal dimension of the practices involved – the regularities and rhythms these disciplines entail. This highly interesting reflection by Chris Till not only highlights such temporalities, but also shows up how with new technological developments in consumer electronics they are intensified and fine-tuned, truly chronifying the healthy body…

This Is Not a Sociology Blog

Self-tracking has been talked up a lot over the last few years as a potential component of e-health or m-health. It has been proposed as a tool of public health and particularly health promotion because of the ways in which it can blend in with the daily life of users. For instance, self-tracking can easily generate data on behaviour change for researchers without bothering users too much, provide automated “nudges” to users (“you’re near the park why not go for a run?”) and potentially form a feedback system to users who will respond to the “gamification” of their daily activities (by trying to beat their previous week’s step count perhaps).

.

The ability of self-tracking devices to blend into everyday life and make exercise easier and more fun has been one of the big drivers for optimism in their potential. While I can see that this could be a…

View original post 492 more words

Advertisements

The instability of the modern middle class family: alienation for progress

08.15.2010 · Posted in Uncategorized

When talking about the importance of the family for a society, one most often thinks in terms of it in terms of a “bedrock”, an anchor of stability and security in a rapidly changing world. While there certainly is a lot of plausibility to the idea that the family is a counter world to and retreat from a capitalist society that thrives on alienation, and that this retreat is functional in the reproduction of balanced personalities who contribute to and survive in that less-than-balanced economy, I would like to suggest that the importance of the middle class nuclear family and its successors in the production of economically successful innovative subjects lies not just in the stability it provides (other family models could do better…) but in the inbuilt element of instability – or at least in a precarious combination of stability and instability. [i]

It is a well-rehearsed theme in conservative social politics from New Labour to Tories and featured high in the current rhetoric of a “broken Britain” that needs mending – here’s just one example (randomly googled – this is from the Daily Telegraph, 29thMarch 2009)

‘Families would be put at the fore-front of the Government’s policy making, with Mr Cameron stressing his belief in the importance of marriage and supporting parents. He said: “We want to see a more responsible society, where people behave in a decent and civilised way, where they understand their obligations to others, to their neighbours, to their country. And above all, to their family.’

I always thought that a nicely working argument against a Thatcherite “who-is-society-?-there-is-no-such-thing-!-there-are-individual-men-and-women-and-there-are-families” rhetoric would be the Marx/Engels[i] and Schumpeter line that bourgeois and middle-class family values are undermined by the very liberal market economy which is said to be so much dependent on – values of loyalty and commitment that are not sustained by the entrepreneurial cost-minimising and profit-maximising self encouraged by the workings of capitalist relations of production and exchange:

‘As soon as men and women learn the utilitarian lesson and refuse to take for granted the traditional arguments that their social environment makes for them, as soon as they acquire the habit of weighing the individual advantages and disadvantages of any prospective course of action – or, as we might put it, as soon as they introduce into their private life a sort of inarticulate system of cost accounting – they cannot fail to become aware the heavy personal sacrifices that family ties and especially parenthood entail under modern conditions and of the fact that at the same time, excepting the cases of farmers and peasants, children cease to be economic assets. These sacrifices do not consist only of the items that come within the reach of the measuring rod of money but comprise in addition an indefinite amount of loss of comfort, of freedom from care, and opportunity to enjoy alternatives of increasing attractiveness and variety – alternatives to be compared with joys of parenthood that are being subjected to a critical analysis of increasing severity.’ (Schumpeter 1942: 157f.)

Which is problematic as at the same time family commitment is a main motivator of economic achievement:

‘the family and the family home used to be the mainspring of the typically bourgeois kind of profit motive. Economists haven’t always given due weight to this fact. When we look more closely at their idea of the self-interest of entrepreneurs and capitalists we cannot fail to discover that the results it was supposed to produce are really not at all what one would expect from the rational self-interest of the detached individual or the childless couple who no longer look at the world through the windows of a family home. Consciously or unconsciously they analyzed the behavior of a man whose views and motives are shaped by such a home and who means to work and to save primarily for wife and children.’ (Schumpeter 1942: 160)

Parsons (applying a Durkheimian figure of thought) saw the vital function of decidedly non-economic attitude in family life for the functioning of (male) subjects in the market economy to which the family vitally contributes and from which it receives its sustenance, but to which it is defined as radically external. The economicisation of family life hence would disable that function; it’d be detrimental to its economic contribution. So that would close the case with a “you’re doing it to yourself”.

However, with all the changes in contemporary family life (see  Allen (1999) for a good overview of the end-of-century situation in the UK) – any attempts of active imposition of economic rationality onto family life or even only economic calculi seeping into the realm of the family have come to no avail. The semantics of love prevail (even if they are commercialised – they are still a main source of legitimacy). And, looking at Schumpeter’s emphasis on the motivational role of working for the children, there isn’t much to worry about:  children wield an impressive purchasing power, and surely that comes from their parents giving them money rather than from a return of child labour. Family income is generated for and spent on loved ones, shopping remains, as Daniel Miller (1998) found in his seminal study of North Londoners’ consumption, essentially driven by love.

Familiar motivations to consume (and hence to seek income) are thus not scarce; and nobody really worries about families’ propensity to spend. The main concern is about the family no longer providing the safe and caring environment to produce offspring who become reliable, emotionally balanced (i.e. self-controlled) economic subjects, producers. The whole issue of loss of values, rising crime and rising teenage pregnancies, loss of entrepreneurial spirit, discipline, respect are all tangled up in the idea that we are, over the centuries, moving from a large, multigenerational, rural, patriarchal family to ever more fragmented and disintegrated forms – a development/degeneration in which the middle class nuclear family is only a stage (Parsons (1956) already had to defend the nuclear family, which we now view as the traditional form that’s slipping away, against the charge that it is basically a damaged left over of the traditional larger familiy). And crucially, that with this decline comes a steady decline in work ethics and discipline. Mitterauer and Sieder (1982) expose this as an ideological construct – mainly by dismantling the historical evidence for such a story. In fact, they show that the average family size in previous centuries in North West Europe wasn’t much greater than in the 20th century.  Given their picture of the pre-industrial family as already quite dynamic one could speculate that maybe such instability is not an economic obstacle but a driving force – particularly against the background that, while acknowledging the function of the family as provider of a secure and loving environment to grow up in, for the allegedly conservative theorists Hegel and Parsons the fact that it is designed to fall apart is equally important:

‘It clearly has to be a group which has relatively long duration – a considerable span of years. But it is not of indefinite duration. One o fits most important characteristics is that the family is a self-liquidating group. On attainment of maturity and marriage the child ceases in the full sense to be a member of his family of orientation ; instead he helps in the establishment of a new one.’ (Parsons, 1954: 104)

In the bourgeois liberal ideal marriage is a total commitment, a merging of two people into one legal person – but resulting from the free will of two persons mutually recognising each other as that: free subjects.

‘Marriage is but the ethical Idea in its immediacy and so has its objective actuality only in the inwardness of subjective feeling and disposition. In this fact is rooted the fundamental contingency of marriage in the world of existence. There can be no compulsion on people to marry;’ (Hegel, Philosophy of Right, para176)

The contradiction is obvious: this is an expression of freedom that consists of freely giving it up in mutual trust that this surrender will not be exploited. The contradiction is resolved by that fact that this mutually recognised freedom is materialised in the production of new, essentially free persons (children as pure potentiality, if you like) – and because they are expressions of freedom they must cannot be retained in the family where there is full recognition of two free persons and their decision to become one… but no room for the freedom of a third person: they need to be released into the world – and the family thus must be dissolved:

‘The ethical dissolution of the family consists in this, that once the children have been educated to freedom of personality, and have come of age, they become recognised as persons in the eyes of the law and as capable of holding free property of their own and founding families of their own, the sons as heads of new families, the daughters as wives. They now have their substantive destiny in the new family; the old family on the other hand falls into the background as merely their ultimate basis and origin, while a fortiori the clan is an abstraction, devoid of rights.’ (Hegel, Philosophy of Right, para177)

The liberal market society (“civil society” in Hegel) results from those individuals propelled out of the communal context in which they were recognised as full personalities (but in such recognition also limited in further self development) into an arena where individuals acknowledge each other as fully free but only abstract individuals whose concrete being is met with general indifference. While this is alienating, it also enables and enforces creative and innovative development of self (producing, in turn, an urge to seek recognition of those selves in intimate relations, leading to further marriages…).

Inspired by Freud, Parsons also highlighted the particular (Oedipal) dynamics of the identifications within the family and their preprogrammed frustrations that propelled particularly middle class sons into careers that on the one hand aspired to satisfy paternal expectations, but on the other hand also needed to reaffirm non-identity and hence fuelled innovation (the inbuilt sexism of this arrangements has often been highlighted – what has been overlooked is that it is a sexism that differs from traditional patriarchy in that structurally represents its illegitimacy – see my argument at the end of the post on romantic consumerism. I would suggest that it may not be a specifically Oedipal constellation that does it, but any constellation which encourages full identifications… and then frustrates them in one way or another). Allert (1998) demonstrates how the dynamics of the triad operating in the nuclear family spawns literary, scientifically and social scientifically innovative subjects, reconstructing in case studies the family histories of Kempowskis, the Einsteins and the Webers. While certainly the nuclear family is not the only family form from which innovative characters can emerge, but it is also quite obvious that it is, historically, the most likely and as Allert showed, structurally very plausible.

If that is the case – and if the crucial factor is the presence of an inner contradiction that drives the intensified emotional bond of the middle class family to a breaking point that necessitates the establishment of a distance between offspring and parents after adolescence – then one can ask whether not the conservative utopia of a harmonious and stable family that maintains control over and responsibility for all relatives, children, grandparents etc. wouldn’t just put the brakes on capitalist cultural and economic development?

Whatever the real composition and size of the pre-capitalist family, there is one feature that makes it an unlikely candidate for producing the kind of personality that could provide the capitalist economy with the kind of innovative and enterprising subjects that the conservative advocates of family harmony so desire – and it is entirely down to cohesion and togetherness. In the words of Philippe Ariès (1962: 398):

‘The historians taught us long ago that the King was never left alone. But, in fact, until the end of the seventeenth century, nobody was ever left alone. The density of social life made isolation virtually impossible, and people who managed to shut themselves up in a room for some time were regarded as exceptional characters: relations between peers, relations between people of the same class but dependent upon one another, relations between masters and servants – these everyday relations never left a man by himself. This sociability had for a long time hindered the formation of the concept of the family, because of the lack of privacy.’

The success is not due to an inherent traditionalism and conservatism of that family form but, I would argue, to a combination of gemeinschaft type total inclusion and an inbuilt tendency for that gemeinschaft to break up and propel its members into its opposite – an individualistic gesellschaft. Conservatives are right to stress that an initial atmosphere of harmony and stability (“ontological security”). As Giddens argues:

‘Creativity, which means the capability to act and think innovatively in relation to pre-established modes of activity, is closely tied to basic trust. Trust itself, by its very nature is in a certain sense creative, because it entails a commitment that is a “leap into the unknown”, a hostage to fortune which implies a preparedness to embrace novel experiences. However, to trust is also (unconsciously or otherwise) to face the possibility of loss: in the case of basic trust, the possible loss of the succour of the caretaking figure or figures. Fear of loss generates effort; the relations which sustain basic trust are “worked at” emotionally by the child in conjunction with learning the “cognitive work” that has to be put into even the most repetitive enactment of convention.’ (Giddens 1991: 41)

What Giddens here fails to acknowledge is that, while this might be a universal condition of growing up a human being, the situation is accentuated considerably by the fact that as Hegel, Freud and Parsons acurately observed, in the modern family the initial “leap into the unknown” is not just made under the possibility of a future loss: that loss is certain and the next leap into the even more unknown is inevitable.

Crucially, the conservative concern isn’t about the middle classes at all – it is about the working classes, it is about the people on the council estates… and here creativity and innovation isn’t really what we’re looking for. It’s disciplined work ethic to be displayed in rather monotonous, low pay jobs. Tony Blair’s former political secretary John McTernan, in an obituary for trade unionist Jimmy Reid in the Daily Telegraph takes the opportunity to also mourn the bygone world of austere working class culture:

The world of mass working- class employment in mines, factories and shipyards went. These had been rough and ready places with, certainly in mining, real risks as well. But they had also spawned a set of social institutions, from working mens’ clubs to trade unions, which gave form and meaning to lives. Adolescents learnt a job or a craft and saw how to be a man. Formal and informal mentoring created social discipline. Talents were spotted and nurtured. One might make a shop steward, another would benefit from a spell at Ruskin College, another would make an elected official. In such a way, quietly and proudly, the British working class made and remade itself. Valuing hard work, thrift, education and getting on. Fashioning institutions that reinforced those virtues. All gone now. A world swept away, and in its place, what? Council estates that are ghettos of worklessness. Feral youths. Gun crime. Parents unable to bring up their own children, and helpless when those very kids have their own babies.

A central element in this culture was the working class family… and that family did indeed provide mutual support, values of solidarity and workmanship, homeliness … but it also stifled aspiration and innovation.  It was just too tightly knit – in the words of Richard Hoggart:

‘The hearth is reserved for the family, whether living at home or nearby, and those who are “something to us”, and look in for a talk or just to sit. Much of the free time of a man and his wife will usually be passed at that hearth; “just staying-in” is still one of the most common leisure-time occupations. It is a cluttered and congested setting, a burrow deeply away from the outside world. There is no telephone to ring, and knocks at the door in the evening are rare. But the group, though restricted, is not private: it is a gregarious group, in which most things are shared, including personality; “our Mam”, “our Dad”, “our Alice” are normal forms of address. To be alone, to think alone, to read quietly is difficult. There is the wireless or television, things to be done in odd bouts, or intermittent snatches of talk (but rarely a sustained conversation); the iron thumps on the table, the dog scratches and yawns or the cat miaows to be let out; the son, drying himself on the family towel near the fire, whistles, or rustles the communal letter from his brother in the army which has been lying on the mantelpiece behind the photo of his sister’s wedding; the girl bursts into a whine because she is too tired to be up at all, the budgerigar twitters.’ (Hoggart 1957: 22f.)

Notably, this engulfing sociality does not only discourage individual expression – there is no retreat, physical or mental –  it makes it difficult for children to let go:

‘Is it to be wondered that married sons and daughters take a few years to wean themselves from their mother’s hearth? Until the needs of their own children make evening visits practically impossible, and this will be a long time after the mother with views on the healthy rearing of children would think it reasonable, the son or daughter with whatever children they have will be around in the evenings.’ (Hoggart 1957: 23)

Michael Young and Peter Willmott confirm this in their study of family life in Bethnal Green published in the same year. (1957: 73)

Needless to say that gun crime and teenage pregnancy are a smoke screen here (there was no shortage of destitution and crime in the olden times – and knife crime isn’t new… remember straight razors and why they were also aptly called “cut throat razors”?). The real issue is with the production of an austere (non-consumerist) workforce whose tendency to strike seems to be judged a minor evil compared to today’s council estate youth’s reluctance to go on their… bicycles? … to find work in the first place. Only there isn’t much work for loyal labourers any more..

Which leads me to conclude: Shouldn’t we be more concerned about tendencies in the other direction? It is all very well to worry about broken families in the inner cities and it would be a good thing to enable less disruptive childhoods there (which probably have as much to do with material resources, educational opportunities, quality of housing stock etc. as they have with family life or its absence) – but if it’s about “keeping the country going”: maybe it’d more appropriate to worry about the trend to curtail children’s freedoms beyond their parents’ immediate control, overwhelming parental involvement in everything from free time to school…

Maybe – just maybe – the  increased messiness of family structures is a natural antidote to the otherwise ever more stifling emotional intensity of nuclear family life, a reaction to the pressures of a culture of intimacy and does not so much endanger as preserve the bourgeois subject.

Allen, Graham (Ed.) (1999): The Sociology of the Family, Oxford: Blackwell

Allert, Tilman (1998): Die Familie: Fallstudien zur Unverwüstlichkeit einer Lebensform, Berlin: DeGruyter

Ariès, Phillipe (1962): Centuries of Childhood, London: Jonathan Cape.

Giddens, Anthony (1991): Modernity and Self-Identity. Self and Society in the Late Modern Age, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Hoggart, Richard (1958) [1957]: The Uses of Literacy, Harmondsworth: Penguin

Miller, Daniel (1998): A Theory of Shopping, Cambridge: Polity.

Mitterauer, Michael/Sieder, Reinhard (1982): The European Family: Patriarchy to Partnership from the Middle Ages to the Present, Oxford: Blackwell

Parsons, Talcott (1954): ‘The Incest Taboo in Relation to Social Structure and the Socialization of the Child’, in: British Journal of Sociology, Vol.5, No.2, pp.101-17.

Parsons, Talcott (1956): ‘The American Family: Its Relations to Personality and to the Social Structure’, in: Talcott Parsons, Robert F. Bales (Eds.): Family. Socialization and Interaction Processes, London: Routledge, Kegan & Paul, pp.3-33

Schumpeter, Joseph A. (1942): Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, New York: Harper

Young, Michael/Willmott (1957): Family and Kinship in East London, Harmondsworth: Pelican.

update 21st august

yes – of course there’s working class creativity and innovation! (as anyone who either happens to have met working class people knows – if you haven’t, reading Willis’ (1990)Common Culture may help). Here’s just one piece of evidence…

madness: our house

which happens also to illustrate nicely the dense description by Richard Hoggart quoted above – NB that one line they smuggled into the nostalgic portrayal of home goes

“something tells you that you’ve gotta get away from it”

And getting away is not easy – partly, as Jimmy Reid kept pointing out, as there’s not much freedom to get anywhere if you haven’t got the money to pay for it… and partly because it’s so difficult to be alone and retreat into yourself. For some reason Reid was able to pull that trick and expand his universe through.. books – as Sir Alex Ferguson recalls

“Our education was football, his education was the Govan Library – he was never out of there. That education gave him an intellect far beyond what we ever thought we could achieve.”

Education was one of Reid’s central concerns and great hopes – as he said in his Glasgow rectorial address

‘The untapped resources of the North Sea are as nothing compared to the untapped resources of our people. I am convinced that the great mass of our people go through life without even a glimmer of what they could have contributed to their fellow human beings. this is a personal tragedy. It is a social crime. The flowering of each individual’s personality and talents is the precondition for everyone’s development.’ (Reid 1972: 11f.)

Reid didn’t reflect on family life here – he saw the main evil in social inequality and the lack of opportunity. But there is a link between the lack of resources and family life: It’s space. And space is a scarce resource – as a commodity it is the nexus between cash and liberty, as I argue in elsewhere

The freedom of the less well off is a much smaller one than that of those with greater spending power. If such a negative concept of freedom implies that its only limit is the obligation of “not injuring the interests of one another; or rather certain interests, which, either by express legal provision or by tacit understanding, ought to be considered as rights”, then in a society with hugely unequal property rights the freedom of the poor is squeezed into what little space is left by the liberties taken by the rich.’ (Varul 2010: 59)

One reason why there is no retreat from the stifling omnipresence of family is that there is not enough room in the house – or rather: not enough rooms. It’s not just middle class women who need, as Virginia Woolf famously called for “a room of one’s own”  (though that’s important as well!) – working class kids  need their own rooms.

Reid, James (1972): Alienation: Address delivered to the University of Glasgow on Friday 28th April 1972, Glasgow: University of Glasgow Publications

Varul, Matthias Zick (2010): ‘Reciprocity, Recognition and Labor Value’, in: Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol.41, No.1, pp.50-72

Willis, Paul (1990) Common Culture, Buckingham: Open University Press

ps

madness are nice – the specials are nicer

[i]The proletarian is without property; his relation to his wife and children has no longer anything in common with the bourgeois family relations” and “Our bourgeois, not content with having wives and daughters of their proletarians at their disposal, not to speak of common prostitutes, take the greatest pleasure in seducing each other’s wives.

[i] This is as much based on what I have learned as an undergraduate in the seminars of Tilman Allert at Tübingen some 15 years ago as it is on my subsequent readings of Hegel, Parsons and contemporary family sociology.

John Stuart Mill Utilitarianism, Liberty, and Representative Government (London: J. M. Dent, 1910), 132

 

Talcott Parsons, the Sick Role and Chronic Illness

(originally titled “Chronic Parsons: the obsolescence and persistence of the sick role in the face of chronic illness and chronic health”)

now published in Body & Society

Abstract

Parsons’ sick role concept has become problematic in the face of the increased significance of chronic illnesses and the growing emphasis on lifestyle-centred health promotion. Both developments de-limit the medical system so that it extends into the world of health, fundamentally changing the doctor-patient relationship. But as the sick role is firmly based on the reciprocities of a resiliently capitalist achievement society it still informs normative expectations in the field of health and illness. The precarious social position of chronic patients between being governed by and being consumers of medicine, I will argue, can only be adequately understood if one involves, as Parsons did, the moral economy surrounding health and illness.

open access pre-publication accepted manuscript

Von der chronischen Krankheit zur chronischen Gesundheit Phänomene der Regierung und der Konsumgesellschaft

 

Paper präsentiert auf der

Gemeinsamen Tagung der Sektionen für Medizin- und Gesundheitssoziologie der Deutschen, Österreichischen und Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Soziologie:

 “Chronisch kranke Menschen zwischen Gesundheitsversorgung und Alltagsbewältigung”

 am 27. und 28. September 2001 in Wien

Einleitung

Die wachsende Vorherrschaft chronischer Krankheiten einerseits und die normative Aufladung gesunder Lebensstile im healthism andererseits sind zwei der meistdiskutierten Veränderungen des Verhältnisses der Gesellschaft zu Krankheit und Gesundheit in den letzten zwei oder drei Jahr­zehnten. Beide stellen eine Entgrenzung der bisherigen Auffassung von Krankheit dar: Im Fall der chronischen Krankheit findet die Krankheit kein Ende und der Kranke wird dauerhaft Patient, im Fall des healthism werden medizinische Anordnungen getroffen noch bevor man überhaupt zum Patienten wird. Im folgenden soll der Frage nachgegangen werden, ob nicht beide Entwicklungen in einem Zusammenhang stehen.*

Ausgangspunkt sind die klassische Krankenrolle nach Parsons und die Veränderungen, die sich durch das Vorherrschen von chronischen Erkrankungen ergeben. Es wird dann auf die kausalen Verbindungen eingegangen, die zwischen chronischen Krankheiten und der präventiven Propagierung „gesunder Lebensstile“ bestehen. Anhand der Parallelen, die zwischen der Lebensfüh­rung chronisch Kranker und den Erwartungen hinsichtlich gesunder Lebensstile bestehen, wird der Begriff der „chronischen Gesundheit“ als Komplementärrolle zur chronischen Krankheit gerechtfertigt. Es wird geprüft, inwieweit die theoretischen Ansätze der gouvernementalité und die Studien um den consumerism darüber Aufschluß geben können, ob und wenn ja wie die über­raschenden Gemeinsamkeiten beider auf gesamtgesellschaftliche Entwicklungen zurückgeführt werden können, die über den immanenten Begründungszusammenhang aus den medizinisch und finanziell vorgegebenen „Sachzwängen“ hinausgehen.

Akute Krankheit, negative Gesundheit

Den Ausgangspunkt soll hier die Krankenrolle nach Parsons bilden. So umstritten sie als Wiedergabe empirischer Realität und subjektiver Wahrnehmung der Kranken selbst auch immer war – ihr Wert als Darstellung des geltenden normativen Hintergrundes wurde kaum je in Zweifel gezogen.[1]

Diese Krankenrolle sei hier nochmals knapp umrissen: Krankheit ist für das soziale System vor allem als Devianz von Bedeutung, weil die erkrankte Person nicht mehr in der Lage ist, die all­täglichen Rollenverpflichtungen im vollen Umfang wahrzunehmen.[2] Da davon ausgegangen wird, daß es sich bei dieser Devianz nicht um eine vom Individuum gewollte oder steuerbare handelt,[3] bietet die Gesellschaft einen Weg, diese Devianz auf nicht punitive, therapeutische Weise wieder in Konformität zu überführen. Der Kranke wird von seinen Rollenverpflichtungen für die Dauer der Krankheit entbunden und vor Schuldvermutungen geschützt,[4] wobei die ärztliche Diagnose die Legitimationsinstanz bildet.

Teil der Rollenverpflichtung des Kranken ist, wieder gesund werden zu wollen (eine „obligation to want to ‚get well’“). Dazu gehört auch, daß ärztliche Hilfe gesucht wird. Er gestattet dem Arzt Zutritt zu der sonst geschützten Privatsphäre, beantwortet sonst als intrusiv geltende Fragen, gestattet sogar sonst als Körperverletzung einzustufende Eingriffe in die physische Integrität. Er begibt sich in ein Vertrauensverhältnis mit seinem Arzt, folgt seinen Anweisungen und sieht das Verhältnis zu ihm als ein ausschließliches. Gerhardt macht darauf aufmerksam, daß es sich dabei um einen entscheidenden Einschnitt in die Autonomie des Patienten handelt:

„Der Zwang, einen Arzt aufzusuchen und seinen Anordnungen Folge zu leisten, d.h. die Behandlung zu bejahen und an ihrem Erfolg nach Kräften mitzuarbeiten, macht es für den Patienten unmöglich, daß er sich wie jeder normale Erwachsene in der modernen Gesellschaft gegen Bevormundungen wehren und nach eigenem Ermessen Entscheidungen treffen darf.“[5]

Die ärztliche Behandlung strebt so die Wiederherstellung von Autonomie durch die Aussetzung von Autonomie an.[6] Aus der Perspektive des Patienten ist diese Wiederherstellung der Autonomie eine Verpflichtung, es gibt geradezu einen Zwang zur Autonomie (compulsory independence.)[7] Diese Komplementarität von Entpflichtung und Entrechtung hat Gerhardt als Bestandteil eines „Reziprozitätsmoratoriums“ bezeichnet. Parsons betont dabei ausdrücklich, daß es sich bei der Entbindung von den Rollenverpflichtungen nicht nur um ein Recht, sondern geradezu eine Verpflichtung des Kranken handelt.[8]

Beide Seiten orientieren sich dabei nicht auf individuellen Nutzen, sondern auf Erfolg bei der Erreichung eines gesellschaftlich geforderten Ziels. Die Gesellschaft ist in der Beziehung Arzt-Patient, die selbst eine Kollektivität mit einem gemeinsamen Ziel bildet, dritte Partei.[9] Es handelt sich mithin weder um ein Arbeitsverhältnis noch um ein Verhältnis von Käufer und Verkäufer. Der Kranke konsumiert nicht ärztliche Leistungen und kauft bei Nichtgefallen diese nicht einfach bei einem anderen Arzt, der Arzt preist seine Leistungen nicht an und versucht dem Patienten nicht so viel wie möglich davon zu verkaufen. Von beiden Seiten wird also der Verzicht auf ein Verhaltensmuster erwartet, das in normalen Geschäftsbeziehungen legitim ist. [10]

Aus alldem ist zu folgern, daß die Krankenrolle idealerweise eine zeitlich begrenzte ist. Explizit erwähnt Parsons eine zeitliche Begrenzung in seiner ersten Konzeption nicht. Erst später, als es galt die Kritik abzuwehren, mit dem Vorherrschen chronischer Krankheiten sei seine Auffassung der Krankenrolle hinfällig, expliziert er die Bedeutung dieser zeitlichen Begrenzung, indem er in diesem Punkt eine Parallele zwischen Kranken- und Studentenrolle aufzeigt. Wie der Patient an einer zu überwindenden Krankheit, leide der Student gewissermaßen an „akutem Nichtwissen“, das im Universitätssystem behoben wird. Typischerweise sei dies kein lebenslanges Unterfangen. Den ewigen Studenten sieht er als Parallele zu jenen Kranken, die einer Genesung Widerstand entgegensetzen, um nicht auf die Sekundärgewinne der Krankenrolle verzichten zu müssen. [11]

Wie die Legitimationsfunktion der ärztlichen Diagnose vor Simulantentum schützen soll, so stellt die temporale Eingrenzung sicher, daß die Krankenrolle auch von „genuin Kranken“ nicht als Rückzugsraum vor unangenehmen Rollenverpflichtungen genutzt wird – wie etwa in der Vorstellung von Krankheit als Befreiung bei Claudine Herzlich[12] – oder der Kranke sie zur Regression nutzt und seine infantilen Abhängigkeitsbedürfnisse auslebt. Eine Abstellung der Therapie auf Dauer muß vor diesem Hintergrund in den Verdacht der Herstellung eines Abhängigkeitsverhältnisses geraten, in dem der Arzt entweder in der Verweigerung der „Gegenübertragung“ versagt oder gar bewußt seine Machtstellung ausnutzt und kommerzielle, emotionale oder andere Vorteile aus der Beziehung zu seinem Patienten zieht. Der Patient kommt in den Verdacht, es am Willen zur Genesung fehlen zu lassen. Daß die zeitliche Begrenzung erst so spät ausdrücklich erwähnt wird, liegt wahrscheinlich schlicht an dem Umstand, daß als Parsons seine Konzeption entwickelt hat, diese einfach selbstverständlich war.[13]

Akute Gesundheit?

Wenn es hier um eine Gegenüberstellung von chronischer Krankheit und „chronischer Gesundheit“ gehen soll, muß natürlich zunächst gefragt werden, worin das Gegenstück zur akuten Krankheit besteht, ob es also eine Komplementärerscheinung „akute Gesundheit“ gibt. Dazu müßte eine irgendwie geartete positive Definition von Gesundheit vorliegen. Die Definition von Gesundheit aus der Perspektive der Akutmedizin ist aber, wie oft beklagt wird, eine rein negative. Luhmann beschreibt dies als den medizinischen Code, der durch einen Positivwert „krank“ und einen Negativwert „gesund“ die Operation des Medizinsystems asymmetrisch strukturiert. „Gesund“ stellt deshalb den Negativwert dar, da es in diesem Fall für die Medizin keine Anschlußmöglichkeit gibt – nur auf Krankheit kann reagiert werden. Medizinisch ist Gesundheit so dadurch definiert, daß es keinen Anlaß gibt ärztlich zu handeln. [14]

Dies ist allerdings nur die Perspektive des Subsystems Medizin. Aus der Sicht der Gesellschaft insgesamt kommt man aus der Konzeption Parsons’ doch zu einer positiven Definition: Gesund ist, wer selbstverantwortlich seinen Rollenverpflichtungen nachkommen kann. In einem späteren Aufsatz führt Parsons dafür den der Biologie entlehnten Begriff der Teleonymie ein, der die Fähigkeit oder Tendenz eines Organismus zu erfolgreichen zielorientierten Handlungsabläufen bezeichnet.[15] Bei einem Zwang zur Unabhängigkeit ist klar, daß Gesundheit als teleonomische Fähigkeit zentrales Element einer funktionierenden Persönlichkeit ist. Man hat dies angesichts der Zentralität der Arbeitsrolle oft auf diese zugespitzt ( „krank“ als „arbeitsunfähig“, „gesund“ als „arbeitsfähig“)[16] und so die Pflicht zur Gesundheit vor allem aus kapitalistischen Systemimperativen abgeleitet. [17]

Diese Begriffe von Krankheit und Gesundheit wurden, wie gesagt, zu einer Zeit entwickelt, in der angenommen wurde, daß letztlich jede Krankheit über kurz oder lang heilbar sein werde. Heute ist klar, daß dies nicht der Fall ist – auch wenn mit der Gentechnik neue Hoffnung in diese Richtung aufgekommen ist. Doch auch hier ist abzusehen, daß mit neuen Mitteln wieder ein ähnlicher Effekt eintreten wird wie durch den bisherigen medizinischen Fortschritt: Einige sonst chronisch oder tödlich verlaufende Krankheiten werden heilbar, aber bei vielen bisher tödlich verlaufenden Krankheiten wird die Überlebensspanne verlängert und sie werden damit in chronische Krankheiten überführt – von der laufenden Entstehung neuer Krankheiten ganz zu schweigen.

Der Kranke, der bleibt – eine neue Krankenrolle

So wie die Krankenrolle nach Parsons kein statistisches Mittel der tatsächlichen Rollenausübung von Ärzten und Patienten in den 1950ern war, sondern eben eine Beschreibung der normativen Erwartungen, die damals gesellschaftlich vorherrschten, so geht es bei einer Behauptung der Ablösung durch die chronische Krankheit auch nicht um die Häufigkeit, sondern um die typische Form der Krankheit – das, was in einer gegebenen Gesellschaft zu einer gegebenen Zeit evoziert wird, wenn von „Krankheit“ die Rede ist. Und das sind heute – wie Gerhardt feststellt – eben chronische Krankheiten.[18] Im folgenden sollen die Implikationen chronischer Krankheit idealtypisch behandelt werden – wohl wissend, daß es die chronische Krankheit so wenig gibt wie die akute Krankheit.

Für viele Autoren stellt dieses Vorherrschen chronischer Krankheiten die Prämissen der Parsonsschen Konzeption in Frage. Für Herzlich und Pierret beispielsweise ergibt sich hier ein Bruch. Wie viele andere verweisen sie darauf, daß mit der Tatsache, daß bei noch so gewissenhafter Anwendung modernster medizinischer Kenntnisse und bei peinlichster compliance der Kranken keine Heilung zu erwarten sei – also mit dem Wegfall der zeitlichen Begrenzung der Krankenrolle – dem ganzen Konzept die Grundlage entzogen sei. [19]

Parsons hat später auf solche Kritik reagiert und versucht, chronische Krankheiten in sein Modell einzuordnen.[20] Die Ausübung normaler Rollen werde hier ganz oder teilweise durch eine ständige medizinische Begleitung und ein vom Kranken einzuhaltendes Regime ermöglicht. [21] Chronisch Kranke werden im Prinzip den gleichen normativen Erwartungen unterworfen wie akut Kranke, wobei diese Erwartungen aber unerfüllbar bleiben und deshalb tendenziell reduziert werden müssen: Erwartet werden eine graduelle Rückkehr in die normale Rollenperformanz und ein generelles Bestreben, die Abhängigkeit von medizinischer Betreuung zu reduzieren.

Der Unterschied zwischen akuter und chronischer Krankheit ist für Parsons mithin ein gradueller, quantitativer. Dieser Unterschied bestimmt auch die Terminologie: Anders ist, daß chronische Krankheit dauert. Dieser zunächst tatsächlich lediglich quantitative Unterschied zieht aber eine Reihe qualitativer nach sich. Parsons sieht dies nicht, weil er die wesentliche Rolle der zeitlichen Begrenzung in seiner ursprüngliche Konzeption eben nur impliziert, aber nicht in ihrer Bedeutung analysiert. Die Verschiebungen, die sich aus einer Perpetuierung der Krankenrolle fast zwangsläufig ergeben, bleiben so unerkannt.

Schon für die Selbstwahrnehmung und die Lebensführung der chronisch Kranken ergeben sich aus der bloßen Dauer Probleme:

“While normal persons, once they are over their acute illness, can soon forget it, the chronically sick cannot forget; their illnesses are either always with them or, if quiescent, potentially lurking just round the corner.”[22]

Die Krankheit wird zum Attribut der Person, hat weitgehende Implikationen für die persönliche Identität, die Selbst- wie die Fremdwahrnehmung.[23] Es besteht keine oder wenig Aussicht auf endgültige Heilung, sondern nur darauf, den Verlauf der Krankheit zu mildern, zu blockieren oder zu verlangsamen, Symptome zu lindern etc. Was dem akut Kranken verwehrt bleibt wird dem chronisch Kranken zur Lebensaufgabe: er muß sich in seiner Krankheit einrichten, sie wird zu einem Teil seiner Identität.

Wenn Parsons aber Recht hat und weiterhin die normative Erwartung auch an den chronisch kranken Patienten die Wiederherstellung von Gesundheit ist, diese aber höchstens tendenziell erreicht werden kann, dann sind diese Patienten auch immer dem Verdacht ausgesetzt, gar nicht gesund werden zu wollen. So beobachten Strauss und Glaser bei Klinikpersonal einen ähnlichen Widerwillen gegenüber chronisch Kranken, die immer wieder eingeliefert werden, wie gegenüber Hypochondern – auch wenn ihnen klar ist, daß sie nichts dafür können.[24] Die Rückkehr zur Normalität – vor allem auch: zur Arbeit – als Erwartung scheint von der klassischen Krankenrolle tatsächlich auf die chronisch Kranken übergegangen zu sein, ohne daß sie im gleichen Maße einlösbar wäre – was zu entsprechenden Problemen im Selbstbild führt.[25] So identifiziert Jobling die wenig erfolgversprechende aber extrem aufwendige Selbstbehandlung bei Psoriasispatienten als Ausdruck der Verpflichtung, gegen die Krankheit anzukämpfen, als sei es eine heilbare.[26]

Es ist daher verständlich, daß chronisch Kranke nach einer möglichst weitgehenden Normalisierung (im Sinne von Angleichung an den Status von Gesunden) streben[27] – getrieben sowohl von den normativen Erwartungen hinsichtlich eines Willens zur Genesung als auch vom Wunsch, der Entmündigung durch medizinische Kontrolle zumindest teilweise zu entrinnen:

“The chief business of a chronically ill person is not just to stay alive or keep his symptoms under control, but to live as normally as possible despite his symptoms and his disease.”[28]

In der Überlebensrationalität, die nach Gerhardt das Handeln der chronisch Kranken strukturiert, geht es, wie sie feststellt nicht allein um das nackte Leben, sondern um die Aufrechterhaltung oder Wiedergewinnung von Lebensqualität und Unabhängigkeit.[29]

Anders als bei akut Kranken, die das Paradigma der Normalisierung als Genesung liefern,[30] ist bei chronisch Kranken diese Bemühung um Normalisierung auf Dauer gestellt. Besonders gilt das für Krankheiten mit degenerativem Verlauf, die den Patienten vor immer neue Anpassungsprobleme stellen. Bei akut Kranken stellt sie eine Ausnahmesituation dar.

Ausdruck des Verbleibs unter medizinischer Kontrolle ist die Verordnung eines Regimes (regimen), an dessen Einhaltung der chronisch Kranke gebunden ist.[31] Dieses ist oft so aufwendig, daß es eine völlige Reorganisation des Alltags erfordert. Wenn man die Bemühungen um die Kontrolle der Symptome, die Vermeidung und Verarbeitung von Krisen und das Management der Wahrnehmung durch andere hinzunimmt, dann wird deutlich, daß in der chronischen Krankheit – zumindest ab einer gewissen Schwere – das Krankheitsmanagement zum strukturierenden Prinzip der Lebensführung wird. Ironischerweise steht ein solches Regime der Bestrebung nach Normalisierung, welche es ja ermöglichen soll, oft im Weg, indem es die Ausübung alltäglicher Rollen erschwert. Die Kranken müssen daher beständig Kompromisse zwischen den beiden konkurrierenden Erwartungen machen.[32] Diese konkurrierenden Erwartungen aber sind es auch, die den chronisch kranken Patienten ein Stück weit der medizinischen Kontrolle entziehen. Schon die allgemeine Regel, die Rose Laub Coser aufgestellt hat, nach der die Komplexität von Rollenerwartungen ein Nährboden der Autonomie sei, legt dies nahe.[33]  So wird auch von Gerhardt immer wieder hervorgehoben, daß es sich bei der Patientenkarriere chronisch Kranker mindestens ebenso um einen Handlungsablauf wie um einen Prozeß des Erleidens handelt. [34]

Wenn die Gegenleistung für die medizinische Entmündigung die Befreiung von den alltäglichen Rollenverpflichtungen ist, dann liegt es nahe, daß diese Entmündigung nicht mehr so uneingeschränkt hingenommen wird, wenn auch die Gegenleistung nur noch eingeschränkt gilt. Wer in einer alltäglichen Rolle autonom agieren muß, kann sich nicht zugleich mehr oder weniger bedingungslos dem Zugriff einer sozialen Kontrollinstanz unterwerfen. Gerade, daß trotz der Krankheit versucht wird, zur Normalität zurückzufinden, sprengt also die klassische Konzeption der Krankenrolle, denn durch die damit verbundene Relativierung des „Reziprozitätsmoratoriums“ wird auch die dafür erwartete Gegenleistung des Einfügens in die Krankenrolle in Frage gestellt.

Und es ist ja auch einsichtig: Mit einem zeitlich begrenzten Moratorium der gesellschaftlichen Reziprozität und der damit verbundenen Aufgabe nicht nur von Pflichten sondern auch von Rechten, mag ein normal sozialisierter Erwachsener in einer modernen Gesellschaft vielleicht gerade noch klarkommen (wenn auch meist widerwillig) – eine Aussetzung dieser Reziprozität auf unabsehbare Zeit, wahrscheinlich sogar für den Rest des Lebens muß unerträglich erscheinen.

Eine weitere Veränderung ergibt sich dadurch, daß wiederum durch die bloße Dauer, aber auch aufgrund der durch diese Dauer begründeten existentiellen Bedeutung der Krankheit, ein Krankheitswissen erworben wird, daß natürlich dem von medizinischen Spezialisten nicht annähernd gleichkommt – das von Allgemeinärzten aber besonders dann übersteigen kann, wenn es sich um seltenere Krankheiten handelt.  Durch solch ein Wissen wird die Asymmetrie des Arzt-Patienten-Verhältnisses teilweise ausbalanciert, wenn auch eine hierarchische Strukturierung grundsätzlich bestehen bleibt. Ein weiterer Faktor ist das Versagen der Medizin selbst vor der normativen Erwartung der Heilung. Nicht nur der chronisch Kranke hat sich angesichts des Verdachts zu legitimieren, er wolle gar nicht wirklich gesund werden – auch der ihn behandelnde Arzt hat ein Legitimationsproblem: Auch wenn die Transformation von tödlich verlaufenden Krankheiten in chronische einen der größten Erfolge der modernen Medizin darstellt, macht gerade dieser Erfolg die Ohnmacht der Medizin gegenüber Krankheit schlechthin deutlich.

Die Autorität, mit der er dem Patienten unangenehme, oft zusätzliche Leiden verursachende Therapien verordnen kann, weil dies der endgültigen Genesung dient, wird dadurch eingeschränkt – Behandlung und Regime werden stärker zum Gegenstand der Aushandlung:

“… the term ‘compliance’ is of limited use in the context of chronic illness. As we have seen, neither the doctor or the patient has complete knowledge or answers, whereas ‘compliance’ suggests that an objective is clear and can be met if the patient does what the doctor orders.”[35]

Die Normalisierungsbestrebungen der chronisch Kranken und ihre Autonomiegewinne bedeuten eine Aufweichung des medizinischen Codes. Luhmann sieht zwar eine Zweitcodierung des Wertes „krank“ in „unheilbar krank/heilbar krank“[36], aber er sieht dabei nur die Implikationen für die Weise der Behandlung. Tatsächlich aber bedeuten die Tendenzen, mit medizinischer Unterstützung, durch teilweise Emanzipation vom Medizinsystem durch Selbsthilfe oder Verlagerung der Versorgung in die Familie, eine Aufweichung dieses medizinischen Codes an sich. Die Medizin bleibt zuständig – daran hängt oft genug das Überleben der Kranken[37] – und aus der Sicht des medizinischen Systems bleiben chronisch Kranke schlicht krank. Aber aus der Sicht der Gesellschaft wird dieser Status relativiert, wenn sie ihre Rollen ganz oder teilweise wieder aufnehmen. Es liegt eine Überschneidung von Perspektiven vor, in der chronisch Kranke versuchen, sich den gesellschaftlichen und den eigenen Erwartungen gemäß als autonom und verantwortlich, mithin gesund, zu entwerfen, während die Medizin sie immer noch in einem Verhältnis sieht, in dem sie dieser Autonomie und Verantwortlichkeit entzogen sind.

Prävention chronischer Krankheit als Pathologisierung der Gesundheit

Wie kommt man nun von der chronischen Krankheit zu der im Titel angekündigten chronischen Gesundheit?

Erstens spielen die Kosten chronischer Krankheit eine Rolle. Ihre Behandlung ist vergleichsweise teuer. Auch diese Kosten sind unter anderem eine Funktion ihrer Dauer. Zwar kann auch akute Behandlung, zum Beispiel in der Unfallchirurgie, teuer werden, aber hier sind die Kosten auf einen kurzen Zeitraum eingrenzbar (selbst wenn es sich um Monate handelt). Etwas anderes ist es, wenn teure Medikamente teilweise lebenslang eingenommen werden müssen, regelmäßig operative Eingriffe unternommen werden müssen, regelmäßig längere Krankenhausaufenthalte nötig werden etc. Hinzu kommen die vielzitierten „volkswirtschaftlichen Kosten“ der Arbeitsausfälle durch lange Krankheitsperioden und Frühverrentungen.

Zweitens gelten viele der chronischen Krankheiten gemeinhin als lebensstilbedingt. Der zugrundeliegende medizinische Lebensstilbegriff ist dabei recht einfach definiert: es geht um die von individuellen Entscheidungen abhängigen Elemente der Lebensführung – vor allem um Ernährung und Bewegung. Thematisch ist also weniger, daß die Anfälligkeit für chronische Krankheiten von einer bestimmten sozialen Lage, die sich unter anderem auch in einem Lebensstil ausdrückt, abhängig ist, sondern es geht vor allem um angeblich relativ einfach zu verändernde individuelle Gewohnheiten.[38] Wenn also die Möglichkeit gesehen wird, diese teuerste Form der Krankheit durch Änderung der Lebensweisen zu vermeiden, was läge da näher als „lebensstilzentrierte Prävention“ – ist doch der Aufruf zur präventiven Änderung des individuellen Verhaltens zur Erhaltung des Gesamtsystems ein beliebtes Mittel der Politik in Zeiten knapper Kassen.[39]

In diesem Zusammenhang hat sich zum Recht auf Gesundheit, i.e. auf gesunde Lebensbedingungen und auf medizinische Versorgung, und zur Verpflichtung des Patienten, zu seiner Genesung beizutragen eine Verpflichtung der Gesunden, ihre Gesundheit zu erhalten gesellt. Besonders in den USA hat sich diese Tendenz, die von Crawford als „healthism“ bezeichnet wurde,[40] weitgehend als dominante Ideologie in den Mittelschichten durchgesetzt. Ähnliche Tendenzen gibt es jedoch auch in Europa, wie die einschlägigen Präventionsappelle belegen.[41]

Dies bedeutet nicht zuletzt eine Ausdehnung des Zugriffs des Medizinsystems über die tatsächlich Kranken hinaus, was eine weitere Aufweichung des medizinischen Codes bedeutet:

“Die Verlagerung des Schwerpunktes von Infektionskrankheiten auf Zivilisationskrankheiten, also auf Krankheiten, die auf schwer zu kontrollierende Weise als Resultat der Lebensführung auftreten, erweitert den Relevanzbereich des Systems auf die gesamte Lebensführung. Fast müßte man sagen: jeder ist krank, weil jeder sterben wird.”[42]

Luhmann sieht allerdings die Geltung des medizinischen Codes nicht als gefährdet an. Was eintritt sind lediglich Zweitcodierungen. So wird der Wert „gesund“ wie zuvor der Wert „krank“ (s.o.) nochmals codiert in „genetisch o.k. / genetisch bedenklich”.[43] Man muß dies wohl ausdehnen auf “gesund: mit geringem Risiko zu erkranken / gesund: mit hohem Erkrankungsrisiko.” In der Medizin läuft diese Zweitcodierung unter dem Titel der „Risikofaktoren“. Solche Risikofaktoren umfassen nicht nur erbliche Prädispositionen, sondern eben auch sogenannte „Lebensstilfaktoren“ wie Ernährung und Bewegung, aber auch die soziale Lage.

Eine wirkliche Unterscheidung von „gesund“ und „krank“ ist dann nicht mehr möglich: Nicht der Wert Gesundheit wird zweitkodiert sondern Risikofaktoren werden pathologisiert und damit versucht, akute Gesundheit auf die Seite der „Krankheit“ zu ziehen.

„Mit dem Konzept der ‚Risikofaktorenmedizin’ wird es theoriegestützt sogar möglich, ‚Krankheit’ im Sinne medizinischer Behandlungsbedürftigkeit dort zu diagnostizieren, wo subjektiv noch keinerlei Befindens- oder Leistungsbeeinträchtigung feststellbar ist. Der Rekurs auf spätere Erkrankungswahrscheinlichkeiten wird plausibilisiert durch Vergleiche aktueller biochemischer und physiologischer Parameter mit denen ‚kriti­scher’ Stichproben chronisch Erkrankter. Diese eher theoretisch-definitorischen Schwierigkeiten haben indes auch praktische Bedeutung: die Unterscheidung zwischen ‚Vorsorge’ und ‚Rehabilitation’ wird weitgehend hinfällig, wenn es keinen klar definierbaren Ausgangspunkt von Krankheit gibt, bzw. wenn dieser (definiert als Feststellung vorliegender ‚Risikofaktoren’) lediglich über Erkrankungswahrscheinlich­keiten größerer Stichproben definiert ist, für den individuellen Einzelfall jedoch keine präzise Aussagekraft hat.“[44]

Die Aufweichung des medizinischen Codes anhand chronischer Krankheit findet also als Doppelangriff statt. Von der einen Seite drängen chronisch Kranke auf eine Existenz zwischen den Werten des Codes (eher gegen den Widerstand der Medizin), auf der anderen Seite drängt die Medizin selbst auf eine Aufweichung des Codes, und so darauf, als Präventivmedizin Zugriff auf einen größeren Teil der Bevölkerung zu erhalten.

Die kausale Verbindung ist ebenfalls beiderseitig. Zwar ist das Anknüpfen von Präventionsmaßnahmen an die Kosten chronischer Krankheiten expliziter, aber auch für die chronisch Kranken hat diese Tendenz Folgen. Wenn gerade chronische Krankheiten beispielsweise als „Zivilisationskrankheiten“ bezeichnet werden und ein Zusammenhang mit der individuellen Lebensführung unterstellt wird, dann gerät die Unschuldsvermutung, die noch gegenüber akut Kranken gegolten hatte, ins Wanken. Schon zu Parsons’ Zeiten galt sie nicht uneingeschränkt – etwa bei Geschlechtskrankheiten. Heute aber gilt beispielsweise gegenüber den Rauchern und Übergewichtigen unter den Herz-Kreislauf-Patienten die Unschuldsvermutung längst nicht mehr. Sie müssen zumindest die Intention zeigen, ihre Gewohnheiten zu ändern.

Gerade auch die populärer werdenden psychosomatischen Krankheitstheorien tragen dazu bei, so etwa in der von Sontag beschriebenen Verbindung von unterdrückten Trieben und Krebs.[45] Bei Parsons war die psychosomatische Seite der Krankheit noch eine, die zwar mit der Motivationsstruktur der Kranken zu tun hatte, die ihnen aber nicht zur Verfügung stand. Auch das schon bringt das Individuum in die Verantwortung, wie Zola vermerkt;[46] je mehr aber die Psyche als dem einzelnen verfügbar imaginiert wird – wie an der Welle von psychologischer Selbsthilfeliteratur abzulesen ist[47] – desto mehr wird die Verantwortung nicht nur für lebensstilbedingte, sondern auch für psychosomatische Aspekte der Krankheit dem Individuum übertragen. Die Krankheit wird zum Ergebnis einer defizienten Persönlichkeit. [48]

Die als Gegenmittel propagierten Lebensstile und Haltungen möchte ich im folgenden als „chronisch gesund“ bezeichnen. Einerseits wegen des kausalen Bezugs auf chronische Krankheit. Andererseits auch deshalb, weil es sich bei dieser Auffassung von Gesundheit um eine handelt, die ein permanentes Management verlangt, das dem der chronischen Krankheit nicht unähnlich ist. Die Beziehung von chronischer Gesundheit auf chronische Krankheit ist nicht nur eine kausale – es gibt vielmehr eine Reihe von Parallelerscheinungen, die daran zweifeln lassen, daß es sich hier um eine bloße Vorbeugungsmaßnahme handelt.

Mit der Gesundheit leben: Chronische Gesundheit als Parallelerscheinung chronischer Krankheit

Wie Mergner und Marstedt es formulierten: Die Unterscheidung von Vorsorge und Rehabilitation wird hinfällig (s.o.). Wenn man nur von der kausalen Verknüpfung von chronischer Krankheit und Präventionsanstrengungen ausgeht, ist das sicher zu weit gegriffen. Allerdings sind einige Parallelerscheinungen tatsächlich kaum von der Hand zu weisen.

Zunächst ist einmal auffällig, daß – wie für die chronisch Kranken – für die chronisch Gesunden ein Regime gilt. Dieses beinhaltet nicht nur eine Anzahl von Dingen, die sie nicht zu sich nehmen dürfen (wie Zigaretten, fettes Essen, stark gezuckerte Produkte, Spirituosen etc.), sondern auch eine Reihe von Nahrungsmitteln (Obst, Gemüse, Vollkornprodukte etc.), die sie zu sich nehmen sollten und eine Reihe von Tätigkeiten, die sie regelmäßig ausüben sollten (körperliche Anstrengung, Entspannungstechniken, etc).

Es ist anzumerken, daß es sich bei der chronischen Gesundheit einerseits um ein Ideal handelt und Gesundheitsförderer oft schon zufrieden wären, wenn sich die Masse der Bevölkerung auch nur in kleinen Schritten auf dieses Ideal zubewegte. Andererseits handelt es sich aber auch um einen empirisch feststellbaren Lebensstil:

„In bestimmten gesellschaftlichen Gruppierungen liegt die Hauptaufmerksamkeit auf einer gesunden Lebensweise. In allen für sie relevanten Bereichen versuchen derartig eingestellte Personen, schädliche Einflüsse zu minimieren oder etwas ihrer Gesundheit Zuträgliches zu tun. Die weltanschauliche Klammer ist eine ganzheitliche Sichtweise, nach der die Anforderungen der unterschiedlichen Lebensbereiche zu koordinieren sind. Einzelfragen treten in ihrer Bedeutung zurück bzw. werden unter dem Blickwinkel ‚Gesundheit’ immer in Relation zur Gesamtheit der übrigen Lebensbereiche betrachtet.“ [49]

Ein extremes aber instrukives Beispiel ist die von US-amerikanischen Wissenschaftlern empfohlene Antwort auf die Wirkungslosigkeit von Diäten (vor allem im Hinblick auf die statistische Korrelation zwischen Übergewicht und Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen): Man hat festgestellt, daß das Körpergewicht um einen individuell unterschiedlichen und vorgegebenen set point nur minimal schwanken kann. Liegt man darüber, wird der Grundumsatz erhöht und der Appetit nimmt ab, liegt man umgekehrt darunter, wird der Grundumsatz heruntergefahren und der Appetit nimmt zu. Eigentlich könnte eine solche Entdeckung der Anlaß dafür sein, sich mit diesem vorgegebenen Gewicht abzufinden und so die eventuell selbst pathogenen Anstrengungen um eine vergebliche Gewichtsreduktion zu vermeiden. Die Antwort dieser Mediziner, ist eine andere: sie heißt life-long diet. Da zeitlich begrenzte Diäten wirkungslos bleiben, weil eben der Körper immer wieder versucht, auf seinen set point zu kommen, müssen wirklich jeden Tag Kalorien gezählt werden, das Fitneßstudio besucht werden etc. Das Regime, das hier vorgeschlagen wird, ist um nicht weniger aufwendig als das von Diabetikern.[50]

Die chronisch Kranken abverlangte Selbstdisziplin und Selbstkontrolle ist so auch ein Element chronischer Gesundheit. Mehr noch: Auch eine Reflexionssteigerung hinsichtlich der Organisation des alltäglichen Lebens, der Beobachtung des eigenen Zustands und die Beziehung dieses Zustands auf das eigene Verhalten (eine Art Management von Symptomen ohne wirkliche Symptome) gehören zum Management chronischer Gesundheit.

Man kann die gesunden Lebensstile tatsächlich soweit treiben, daß sie – eben wie bei chronisch Kranken das Management ihrer Krankheit – zum strukturierenden Prinzip der Lebensführung werden. Dabei geht es nicht nur um die Vermeidung bestimmter Produkte und die Einhaltung bestimmter Ernährungs- und Bewegungsvorschriften (die bei der Prävention von chronischen Rückenschmerzen ständig bedacht werden müssen). Die Lebensführung muß auch insofern umgestellt werden, als bestimmte soziale Situationen (z.B. welche, in denen geraucht wird) gemieden werden, die Zubereitung der Lebensmittel muß besonders organisiert werden und auch die Beschaffung der Lebensmittel kann aufwendig werden.

Präventionsappelle betonen oft die Einfachheit dieser Maßnahmen, doch bei genauerem Hinsehen bedeuten sie – will man sich an alle halten – einen beträchtlichen Aufwand. Beispielsweise wird empfohlen, weniger gesättigte Fettsäuren und mehr ungesättigte zu sich zu nehmen. Dazu muß man zunächst aber einmal herausfinden, wo welche Fettsäuren enthalten sind. Erschwert wird das Ganze durch konkurrierende Empfehlungen. Vom kardiologischen Standpunkt aus ist jede Bewegung gut, die den Kreislauf in Gang bringt. Vom orthopädischen Standpunkt aus wird wieder eingeschränkt, daß bestimmte Bewegungsarten wie Jogging auf Asphalt, Sport mit viel Abstoppen wie Tennis oder Volleyball zu chronischen Verschleißerscheinungen an den Gelenken führen können. Vom kardiologischen und onkologischen Standpunkt aus soll der Konsum von Fett reduziert werden – um aber nicht, wie in den USA geschehen, den Rückgang von Herz-Kreislauf-Erkrankungen durch einen Anstieg von Zuckerkrankheit zu bezahlen, dürfen andererseits die Fette nicht einfach durch Kohlenhydrate ersetzt werden. Während mittlerweile unbestritten ist, daß der regelmäßige und mäßige Genuß von Alkohol einen Schutzfaktor gegen Herzinfarkt darstellt, wird im Rahmen der Krebsprävention vor Alkohol uneingeschränkt gewarnt. Für die Krebsprävention sind zudem verschiedene Vorschriften zu beachten, wie etwa die Vermeidung von bestimmten Zubereitungsweisen, die Vermeidung von bestimmten Kombinationen von Lebensmitteln etc., die über den einfachen Hinweis: mehr Gemüse, weniger Fleisch! hinausgehen. Außerdem müssen karzinogene Situationen gemieden werden (beispielsweise  Sonneneinstrahlung). Nimmt man dann noch weitere Präventionsmaßnahmen, etwa gegen chronische Rückenleiden, hinzu, die bestimmte Weisen des Sitzen, Liegens und Hebens sowie bestimmte, regelmäßige Übungen propagieren, dann bleibt kein Element des Tagesablaufs außen vor.

Gesteigert wird das dann noch, wenn man nicht nur den offiziellen Empfehlungen des Robert-Koch-Instituts oder des Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrums folgt, sondern auch den Empfehlungen der verschiedenen auf diesem Feld tätigen Organisationen und Firmen – von der Einnahme bestimmter Präparate bis zur strikten Rohkost gibt es ein weites Spektrum von vor allem Konsummöglichkeiten, von Yoga bis Meditation eine Unzahl Betätigungsfelder, durch die man den Alltag ausfüllen kann.

Dabei wird deutlich: Nicht allein eine erhebliche Selbstdisziplin in der Durchhaltung eines Regimes ist Teil chronischer Gesundheit – auch ein dem Krankheitswissen analoges Gesundheitswissen gehört dazu, das über Gesundheitsliteratur, Fernsehsendungen, Zeitschriften und Kurse erworben werden kann.

Den Gesunden, die noch schlicht den negativen Wert des medizinischen Codes bildeten, war Normalität noch selbstverständlich. Dem chronisch Gesunden wird sie wie dem chronisch Kranken zur beständig zu reproduzierenden: aus Normalität wird Normalisierung. Ein Ablassen vom gesunden Lebensstil kann zu selbstverschuldeter Krankheit führen.

Das volle Programm ist für einen arbeitenden und nicht übermäßig reichen Menschen kaum durchführbar. Das führt bei denen, die das chronisch gesunde Ideal für sich akzeptieren, dazu, daß sie wie die chronisch Kranken Kompromisse mit den Erfordernissen der alltäglichen Lebensführung, die meist als pathogen wahrgenommen wird, machen müssen.

Noch die schärfsten Vertreter gesunder Lebensführung gehen solche Kompromisse ein. Zum Beispiel erklärt ein Mann, der in einer fast schon als asketisch zu bezeichnenden Weise gesund lebt, sein Gemüse größtenteils im Supermarkt zu kaufen (statt, wie er eigentlich besser fände, im Bioladen), da der Lebensstil sonst nicht mehr finanzierbar wäre. Eine Lehrerin, die sehr gesundheitsbewußt lebt, muß Kompromisse machen, weil sie wegen ihrer beruflichen Tätigkeit oft nicht selbst kochen kann. Es offenbart sich dabei ein Paradox: Es ist gerade die die Lebensführung reglementierende Zivilisation, die für die modernen chronischen Krankheiten verantwortlich gemacht wird, aber die Gegenmaßnahmen bestehen aus zusätzlichem zivilisatorischem Aufwand und zusätzlichen Einschränkungen:

“In spite of their beneficial effects, health measures are, in effect, one more constraint imposed upon us by the way of life. This leads us to what we shall call the ‘health paradox’: in response to an unhealthy and constraining way of life, the individual must have recourse to practices themselves constraining and unnatural.”[51]

Andererseits ist gerade auch wegen der uneingeschränkten Ausübung der alltäglichen Rollen der Druck nicht besonders hoch: noch weniger als den chronisch Kranken kann man denen, die das Ideal der chronischen Gesundheit akzeptieren, vorwerfen, sie würden sich drücken. Bezeichnend ist, daß diejenigen chronisch Gesunden, die sich am ehesten noch defensiv legitimieren und die Disziplin in der Lebensführung aufrechterhalten, jene sind, die schon die Erfahrung einer chronischen Krankheit gemacht haben. Aber selbst bei ihnen gibt es – vor allem durch den Kontrast zur Mehrheit der einfach nur akut Gesunden – genügend Selbstbewußtsein, um sich gelegentlich auch eigentlich “ungesunde” Genüsse zu gönnen. (Etwa, daß einmal pro Woche Fleisch gegessen wird, oder daß man bei Einladungen zum Essen die Gelegenheit zum Bruch der selbstauferlegten Diät wahrnimmt.)

Anders als bei der kausalen Verknüpfung ist bei den parallelen Merkmalen chronischer Gesundheit und chronischer Krankheit kaum von einer gegenseitigen Beeinflussung auszugehen: Man übersetzt Regime und Rehabilitation der Kranken nicht einfach in einen erstrebenswerten Lebensstil (obwohl medizinische Erkenntnisse über vorteilhafte Diäten bei z.B. Infarktpatienten ihren Weg in die Empfehlungen der Gesundheitsvorsorge finden). Vielmehr ist zu fragen, ob nicht eine generelle gesellschaftliche Entwicklung vorliegt, die diese Parallelen erklären könnte. Im folgenden sollen zwei solche Entwicklungen verfolgt werden: die der neoliberalen gouvernementalité und die der Konsumgesellschaft. Erstere wird durch die eigenartige Verknüpfung von Autonomiegewinnen einerseits und Reglementierung und Durchstrukturierung andererseits nahegelegt: man fragt sich, ob bei aller Freiwilligkeit nicht doch eine Form der Regierung vorliegt. Letztere drängt sich auf, da es sich insbesondere bei der chronischen Gesundheit um einen Konsumstil handelt. Zudem soll gezeigt werden, daß diese Perspektive die der gouvernementalité ergänzen kann, wo diese in der Erklärung versagt.

Chronische Regierung: die Steuerung von Kranken und Gesunden

Die Theorie der gouvernementalité stellt eine Weiterentwicklung des Foucaultschen Ansatzes zum Verständnis neoliberaler Regierung dar. Anders als bei den Theoretikern des Neoliberalismus selbst und auch anders als bei deren Kritikern wird hier nicht davon ausgegangen, daß heute weniger regiert würde als zuvor. Der zur Anwendung gebrachte Foucaultsche Begriff der Regierung beschränkt sich nicht auf staatliches Handeln, sondern beinhaltet jegliche Steuerung von Verhalten von der Kindererziehung bis zur großen Politik. [52] Mit diesem Begriff wird es möglich, eine spezifisch neoliberale Form der Regierung „auf Distanz“ im Rückzug der staatlichen Instanzen aufzudecken. Dabei wird gerade das “Private” eher noch mehr regiert als zuvor.

Angestrebt wird eine Zurichtung der Subjekte in der Weise, daß sich eine Harmonisierung individueller Kalküle und gesellschaftlicher Verantwortung ergibt:

„Das Spezifikum der neoliberalen Rationalität liegt in der anvisierten Kongruenz zwischen einem verantwortlich-moralischen und einem rational-kalkulierenden Subjekt. Sie zielt auf die Konstruktion verantwortlicher Subjekte, deren moralische Qualität sich darüber bestimmt, dass sie die Kosten und Nutzen eines bestimmten Handelns in Abgrenzung zu möglichen Handlungsalternativen rational kalkulieren. Da die Wahl der Handlungsoptionen innerhalb der neoliberalen Rationalität als Ausdruck eines freien Willens auf der Basis einer selbstbestimmten Entscheidung erscheint, sind die Folgen des Handelns dem Subjekt allein zuzurechnen und von ihm selbst zu verantworten.“[53]

Die Regierung wird in das Individuum hineinverlagert, das so zum autonomen und zugleich verantwortlichen Subjekt wird. Jedes Individuum soll zum Agenten der Aufrechterhaltung eines gesunden und effizienten Gemeinwesens werden. Es werden keine Vorgaben gemacht, wie man sich zu verhalten habe, und es wird auch kein Zwang ausgeübt. Vielmehr werden von unterschiedlichen Agenturen, Instanzen, Institutionen etc. Angebote gemacht, sich auf bestimmte Weisen zu verhalten, sich darzustellen, Produkte zu wählen usw. Was vorgegeben wird, ist, daß man selbstverantwortlich für seine Lebensführung einsteht und durch die Ausübung von Entscheidungen einen Lebensstil zusammenstellt, der einen für andere lesbar macht und in das Gefüge der Gesellschaft einordnet.[54]

Mittel und Technologien dieser Form der Regierung sind beispielsweise Propagierung von Lifestyle durch die Massenmedien, Beratung, Versicherungstechniken, Techniken der Inskription und der Kalkulation. Die Palette der Regierungstechnologien, die bislang analysiert wurden, reicht von der psychologischen Selbsthilfeliteratur über Managementseminare und „Aufklärung“ über genetische Risikofaktoren bis zur Privatisierung des Risikos in der Krankenversicherung.

Diese Form der Regierung erfordert mehr noch als jede andere (und anders als die Souveränität) ein Wissen um die Subjekte der Macht. Es soll an deren Hoffnungen, Ideale und Wünsche angeknüpft werden. Daher spielt Expertise hier eine besonders große Rolle. Experten liefern das Wissen über die Bevölkerung und identifizieren riskante Segmente, entwickeln Instrumentarien der Regierung, bieten Lösungen für Probleme an und legitimieren nicht zuletzt auch die Ausübung von Macht (z.B. durch „Sachzwänge“). Zugleich bieten sie den Subjekten Technologien des Selbst an, durch die sie die Ansprüche der neoliberalen Gesellschaft bewältigen können.

Daß chronisch Kranke im Sinne des oben ausgeführten Begriffes regiert werden, ist kaum zu bezweifeln – dazu muß man nicht unterstellen, daß es den jeweils regierenden Institutionen und Autoritäten um Macht ginge. Im Gegenteil: Ziel der Regierung chronisch Kranker ist primär deren Wohlbefinden und es gibt wohl außer in nicht legitimen Ausnahmefällen kaum einen Grund, daran zu zweifeln, daß das von Parsons hervorgehobene professionelle Ethos der altruistischen Orientierung außer Kraft gesetzt sei. Schon die hospitalisierende Regierung chronisch Kranker ist zuerst und vor allem auf deren eigenes Wohlergehen ausgerichtet. Es geht hier um die Ausübung zur modernen Regierung transformierter „pastoraler Macht.“[55] Das Wohlergehen und die Gesundheit (wie in der eigentlichen pastoralen Macht die individuelle Erlösung) ist dabei nicht letzter Zweck: das Wohlergehen der Bevölkerung ist selbst Machtinstrument – nur eine Bevölkerung, der es „gut geht“ ist zur Gefolgschaft bereit.[56]

„Regiert“ wurden auch schon akut Kranke. Was neu ist, ist die Verlagerung der „Regierungsverantwortung“ in die chronisch Kranken selbst. Diese sollen als verantwortliche und autonome Subjekte selbst die für ihr Wohl richtigen Maßnahmen durchführen. Die Medizin schafft die Bedingungen für diese Selbstregierung, indem die Kranken über das notwendige Regime instruiert wird, indem notwendige Techniken gelehrt werden, über zu überwachende relevante Symptome aufgeklärt wird, indem technische Mittel bereitgestellt werden etc. Die Kranken lernen, über Techniken der Kalkulation und der Inskription, der Buchführung und der Messung, sich für die Medizin “lesbar” zu machen. Zugleich lernen sie einige der Standards, an denen sie selbst Erfolg oder Mißerfolg von Behandlungen und ihrer eigenen Lebensführung beurteilen können. In dem Maße, wie sie sich selbst berechenbar machen, werden sie zu Subjekten der Macht. Darüber hinaus wird ein Angebot an Beratung und Betreuung entwickelt, das chronisch Kranke in Anspruch nehmen können – dies reicht von psychologischen Beratungsangeboten der Kliniken bis zu den Selbsthilfegruppen.

Das Regime der chronisch Kranken, in dessen Ausführung sie sich als verantwortungsvolle Subjekte erweisen, erscheint zunächst als eine natürliche Konsequenz des Willens zu überleben. Doch gerade die normative Befrachtung, die oben dargestellt wurde, zeigt, daß es hier eben – sei es zu welchem Ende auch immer – auch um Regierung geht. Legitimiert wird diese Regierung nicht zuletzt durch Expertenwissen, zu dem in jedem Einzelfall die chronisch Kranken durch Bericht ihrer Selbstbeobachtung (Blutdruck, Blutzuckerwerte, relevante Symptome) beitragen. Von Kontrolle und Disziplinierung im Rahmen der Klinik wird zur Selbstkontrolle und Selbstdisziplin im Privaten übergegangen.

Bei all dem bleiben sie autonome Subjekte – jedenfalls im Vergleich zu den von der Akutmedizin Betreuten. Diese Autonomie drückt sich in den Kompromissen aus, die sie zwischen verschiedenen Zielsetzungen schließen können: Prinzipiell steht es ihnen auch frei, sich ganz gegen die geforderte „Überlebensrationalität“ zu entscheiden – und einige wenige tun dies auch. In den Fällen, wo dies nicht den Tod zur Folge hat, ist die gesellschaftliche Antwort die Aberkennung des Status des autonomen, verantwortlichen Subjekts. Dann greifen wieder die alten Maßnahmen der Betreuung in Institutionen; hier zeigt sich, daß in der Tat nicht ein Modus des Regierens von anderen abgelöst wird, sondern daß die alten Methoden in der Hinterhand bereitgehalten werden für den Fall, daß die neuen versagen.[57] Die Drohung des Entzugs der Autonomie, der man sich als verantwortungsloses Individuum ausgesetzt sieht, ist ein Relikt aus dem alten liberalen Konzept.[58] Dies ist sicher nicht aus strategischen Erwägungen beibehalten worden, sondern liegt schlicht in der Natur der Sache: Chronische Krankheit mag eine soziale Konstruktion sein, aber sie ist eine, die auf einem realen körperlichen Substrat beruht. [59]

Darin besteht aber auch der Hauptunterschied zwischen chronischer Krankheit und chronischer Gesundheit. Dieses körperliche Substrat nämlich reagiert – wenn überhaupt – im Fall der chronisch Gesunden viel langsamer und führt so nicht unmittelbar zur Krise und damit Aberkennung der Autonomie. Damit stellt dieser Fall aus dem Blickwinkel der gouvernementalité den reineren Fall dar, aber auch gerade deswegen den paradoxeren.

Auch chronisch Gesunde werden regiert. Chronisch Gesunde lassen sich von Expertenmeinungen zur Korrelation von bestimmten Lebensweisen zu bestimmten Krankheiten leiten, von Appellen, schulisch Vermitteltem, ärztlich Empfohlenem, von Krankenkassen Angebotenen, von in Reformhäusern Ausgelegtem etc.  Auch hier ist die Legitimationsgrundlage Expertentum, sei es in Form von wissenschaftlichen Studien, sei es in den Verkündungen charismatischer Gesundheitsapostel, die sich oft auf eher diffuse esoterische Theorien berufen.[60] Nettleton sieht in der Konstruktion von Gesundheitsrisiken eine Technologie der Regierung[61] – anders als beispielsweise bei Beck ist in den gouvernementalité-Studien Risiko durchweg als Konstrukt und nicht als objektiver Sachverhalt konzipiert.[62] Es ist dann wiederum dieses konstruierte Risiko, was die Individuen dazu treibt, bei Experten Rat zu suchen, wie sie sich dagegen schützen können. Fraglos ist auch das Risiko für chronisch Kranke ein konstruiertes – doch diese Konstruktion erweist sich meist als ziemlich nah an den somatischen Erfahrungen der Betroffenen.[63]

Weitere Expertise fließt in die Erstellung von Präventionsprogrammen ein, in welchen die Humanwissenschaften Wissen über die Motivationsstruktur und die zu setzenden Anreize zusammentragen und dieses in die Gestaltung einfließen lassen. Es handelt sich also auch hier um eine Form der Regierung, die sehr stark auf dem Wissen um ihre Subjekte beruht. Die einfachste Form der Regierung ist die ideologische Konstruktion von Verantwortlichkeit in Appellen und die Verbreitung wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse über die Bedeutsamkeit des Lebensstils für die Gesundheit. Der bisher schärfste Eingriff, der aber immer noch sehr indirekt wirkt, ist die Einrichtung von Risikozuschlägen bei privaten Krankenversicherungen, die so wahrscheinlich nicht weltweit Schule machen wird. Des weiteren wird Wissen der Subjekte über sich selbst und darüber, „was gut für sie ist,“ produziert.

Als autonome Subjekte sind chronisch Gesunde Agenten ihrer eigenen Regierung.

 “Governments, policy-makers and other institutions and agencies can provide the ‘facts’ but ultimately it is individuals who decide, select and act upon them.”[64]

Das wird schon daran sichtbar, daß es unterschiedlichste Ausprägungen gibt, die sich jeweils an eher „schulmedizinischen“ Präventionsidealen oder eher an „alternativen“ Ansätzen orientieren, daran, daß – wie bei den chronisch Kranken auch – Kompromisse mit Alltagsbewältigung und Lebensgenuß überhaupt geschlossen werden, und nicht zuletzt auch daran, daß die große Mehrheit der Bevölkerung auf dieses Ideal nur mit sehr geringen Verhaltensänderungen reagiert. Die oben erwähnten Brüche des Regimes beispielsweise durch sporadisches comfort eating[65] haben unter anderem auch die Funktion, gerade die Freiwilligkeit des gewählten gesunden Lebensstils zu demonstrieren. Wie das treat beim shopping allgemein,[66] so ist auch hier die Abweichung vom sozial Erwarteten Ausweis der subjektiven Autonomie, zeigt aber gerade im „Ich könnte auch anders“ die moralische Qualität der sonst durchgehaltenen Konformität.

Chronisch Gesunde stellen aufgrund von ihnen selbst zusammengetragenem Wissen, selbst konsultierten Experten (Hausärzte, Vortragende in Volkshochschulen etc.) und Halbexperten (Personal in Reformhäusern), selbst besorgter Literatur (vom Ratgeberbuch bis zur Broschüre), Informationen aus den Medien etc., ihr eigenes Regime zusammen. Sie unterwerfen sich selbst aus freien Stücken der damit verbundenen Disziplin und Selbstbeobachtung und konstituieren sich so in dieser Hinsicht als verantwortliche Subjekte. Sie selbst sind es, die beispielsweise die „Zivilisierung des Appetits“[67] auf bisher ungekannte Höhen treiben.

Vertreter der gouvernementalité sehen in solcher Selbstdisziplin ein wesentliches Element neoliberaler Regierung. Neoliberalismus, so Rose und Miller, bedeutet daher nicht einfach die Aufgabe der Regierung des Privaten:

“These reorganized programmes of government utilise and instrumentalise the multitude of experts of management, of family life, of lifestyle who have proliferated at the points of intersection of socio-political aspirations and private desires for self-advancement. Through this loose assemblage of agents, calculations, techniques, images and commodities, individuals can be governed through their freedom of choice.”[68]

Die Formulierung: „Regierung durch Wahlfreiheit“ ist offensichtlich bewußt paradox gehalten – und Gründe dafür gibt es auch bei den hier vorgestellten Phänomenen. Wie kommt diese Übereinstimmung von offiziell Gewünschtem, von politischer Rationalität und individuellem Kalkül zustande, von der Lemke spricht? Hier liegt der wunde Punkt der Theorie der gouvernementalité: Sie stellt einen uneingestandenen Funktionalismus dar. Die Regierungsförmigkeit der Verhaltensweisen reicht hin, um ihr Vorhandensein zu erklären. Und eben weil es sich um einen uneingestandenen Funktionalismus handelt, werden andererseits die strengen Bedingungen, wie sie beispielsweise Douglas für funktionalistische Erklärung aufgestellt hat, nicht eingehalten.[69] Durch diesen Funktionalismus fühlt man sich von der Aufgabe einer Genealogie der Gefolgschaft entbunden. Geschrieben wird eine Genealogie der Programme, die Antworten auf Probleme der Regierung geben.[70]

In den Schriften zur gouvernementalité wird zwar immer wieder betont, daß die Apparate, Technologien, Instanzen der neoliberalen Regierung sehr heterogen sind und mit viel Reibungsverlust und Dysfunktionalität arbeiten – aber es ist immer so, daß der auf Probleme bezogene Wille zu Regieren hinter der Implementierung von Regierungstechnologien steht.

Wäre das auch im Fall der chronischen Krankheit und Gesundheit so, dann könnte man sich vorstellen, daß unterschiedliche Experten und Organisationen, Verwaltungsbeamte oder wer auch immer, einen Bedarf an regierenden Maßnahmen im Feld der Gesundheit gesehen hat. Das ist bei weitem nicht abwegig, sondern – wie seit Foucault bekannt – ist die Gesundheit ein bevorzugtes Ziel der Regierung (als “Biopolitik”).

Aber im konkreten Fall ist es doch sehr unwahrscheinlich, daß die Autonomisierung und gleichzeitige Selbstdisziplinierung von chronisch Kranken allein ein Ergebnis regierender Eingriffe gewesen sein soll. Zwar wurden anfangs Selbsthilfegruppen von Ärzten gegründet, um für die Lebensführung außerhalb des Krankenhauses relevantes Wissen weiterzuvermitteln. Die verbreitete Haltung bei Ärzten bestand aber gerade in der Ablehnung der Weitergabe des geheiligten Wissens. Die Patienten mußten sich den Zugang dazu geradezu erkämpfen. Anzunehmen, daß darin bereits die Wendung in eine Regierungstechnik angelegt war, hieße, eine besonders raffinierte List der Vernunft zu unterstellen

Ähnlich ist es im Bereich der Prävention. Auch hier kamen die Impulse vor allem von denen, die nun selbst diszipliniert werden und sie richteten sich gerade gegen die wohlfahrtsstaatliche medizinische Bevormundung, wie Glassner anhand der Fitneßbewegung hervorhebt:

“Fitness programs promise direct control over the effects of nature, as well as freedom from medical professionals, and the achievement of personal morality. And they offer outcomes one can feel almost every day of one’s life.”[71]

Es war gerade das Streben nach Selbstverantwortung, das die Prävention antrieb. Das Schlagwort, Vorbeugen sei besser als Heilen, das die Losung der Präventionsbewegung sowohl in der Sicherheits- als auch der Gesundheitspolitik ist, war ja gerade gegen den regierenden Zugriff im medizinischen System gerichtet. Die Selbstregierung war sozusagen der Preis, der dafür zu zahlen war.

Während in der gouvernementalité Funktionsprobleme thematisiert werden, die aufgrund der  Reappropriation der Herrschaftsinstrumente durch die Beherrschten entstehen, ist die Geschichte hier eher eine umgekehrte – obwohl es klar sein dürfte, daß in einer „Dialektik der Kontrolle“[72] gerade auch ursprünglich auf Regierbarkeit angelegte Technologien des Selbst gegen Herrschaft gewendet werden können. Nachdem die Subjekte des Wohlfahrtsstaats dessen Herrschaftstechnologien teilweise gegen diesen gekehrt haben, werden nun gerade die Technologien der dabei am Erfolgreichsten wieder gegen sie gewendet. Es ist symptomatisch, daß, wenn es um die Perspektive der Subjekte selbst geht, beispielsweise Nettleton, als eine der wenigen, die diese Perspektive berücksichtigen, sich nicht mehr auf Foucault oder die gouvernementalité bezieht, sondern auf Giddens.[73] Dieser begreift die Reflexionssteigerung in der „späten Moderne“ aber nicht einfach als Machtphänomen, sondern vor allem auch als das Ergebnis einer Emanzipationsgeschichte.

Illustrative Beispiele für eine solche Verkehrung von emanzipativen Tendenzen in  gouvernmentale gibt es viele – man denke nur an die Transformation von Jane Fonda von der politischen Aktivistin gegen das US-amerikanische Establishment zur Vortänzerin der neuen Mittelschichten. Barry Glassner stellt hinsichtlich der Gesundheitsbewegung in den USA fest, daß sich die anfangs politischen Motive verschoben haben. Ihren Beitrag sehen die Gesundheitsbewußten nicht mehr im Versuch der gesellschaftlichen Veränderung, sondern im Streben, gute Bürger zu sein:

“Unlike an earlier generation of exercisers and healthy eaters, the current practitioners of fitness frequently disengage their bodies rather than put them directly to the service of building a better America. They do believe they are improving America, but indirectly, by way of the side effects of their endeavor – by becoming more productive and less of a burden to society in their old age, for example.”[74]

Das Anliegen der radikalen Medizinkritik war gerade auch, die Verantwortung für die eigene Gesundheit, die man durch die Ärzteschaft enteignet sah, zurückzugewinnen. Ivan Illich beklagte damals:

“As the medical institution assumes the management of suffering, my responsibility for my and your suffering declines.”[75]

In einer Anmerkung dazu hebt er zwar hervor, daß es hier nicht um die Verantwortung gegenüber anderen oder der Gesellschaft, sondern um eine Sache des Gewissens gehe, doch daß wer selbstverantwortlich ist auch zur Verantwortung gezogen werden kann, hat sich schnell herausgestellt. Lupton identifiziert die Annahme, mit dem bloßen Wegfall medizinischer Dominanz trete quasi automatisch ein befreiter Körper und ein befreites Subjekt hervor, denn auch als den Schwachpunkt der bisherigen Kritik der Medikalisierung.[76]

Der Effekt der Regierung durch Autonomie soll also hier nicht in Frage gestellt werden: So oppositionell die Wurzeln der Gesundheitsbewegung und der Selbsthilfegruppen auch sein mögen, und so oppositionell ihr Gestus auch immer noch sein mag: Sie gliedern sich nahtlos in den normativen Diskurs des verantwortlichen Bürgers ein. Aber die angebotene Erklärung befriedigt nicht. Unter dem Aspekt der gouvernementalité  sind Programme, Strategien und Technologien funktionale Antworten auf Probleme der Regierbarkeit.[77] Hier aber entsteht Regierung aus Emanzipation heraus. Dieses Einholen der Emanzipation durch neue, teils selbstgeschaffene Formen der Regierung, wird von den Theoretikern der gouvernementalité  nicht berücksichtigt. Oppositionelle Programme, sofern sie sich zu späterer Zeit auch nur teilweise durchsetzen, werden als Element der Regierung definiert. Da aber keine Opposition und kein Widerstand (außer bloßer Verweigerung) ohne ein Gegenprogramm auskommt,[78] verschwindet so Opposition in der Regierung. Es wird dadurch unmöglich, jene Widerstände, die Foucault als wesentlich für die Analyse jener Macht, gegen die sie sich richten, hielt,[79] als solche zu begreifen – und nicht als besonders trickreichen Zug der Geschichte. Bei aller Betonung des Fragmentarischen und Heterogenen der Regierungsapparate wird auf diese Weise alles von vornherein als Beitrag zum Aufbau eines umfassenden (wenn auch löchrigen) Netzes der Regierung gesehen. [80]

Dort, wo oppositionelle Programme nicht von vornherein als Teil der Regierung aufgefaßt werden, wird ihr Beitrag lediglich in der Schwächung des Alten, nicht aber in seiner Funktion der Wegbereitung neuer Formen der Regierung gesehen[81] – so etwa die feministischen, ökologischen, radikalen, libertären etc. Widerstände gegen den Wohlfahrtsstaat. Die kritische Dimension bei Foucault, seine Forderung nach permanenter Wachsamkeit auch gegenüber emanzipativen Bestrebungen,[82] die in direkter Linie von der frühen Frankfurter Schule abstammt, wird so kassiert.

Hinsichtlich der paradoxen Formel der Regierung durch Autonomie und Freiheit liegt der Verdacht nahe, daß hier von einem präformierten Subjekt ausgegangen wird. Tatsächlich wird anhand des Scheiterns neoliberaler Konzepte im ehemaligen Ostblock eine solche Präformation durch die Phase des Wohlfahrtsstaats unterstellt.[83] Foucaults verfängliche Ausdeutung des Begriffs sujet bzw. subject als doppeldeutig: Untertan bzw. unterworfen und Subjekt,[84] könnte hier verheerend gewirkt haben. Wenn das Subjekt erst durch Herrschaft entsteht, dann ist es letztlich kein Wunder, wenn es nach jahrhundertelanger Subjektivierung endlich zur Selbstbeherrschung im Sinne einer Gemeinschaft fähig und willig wird. Foucault selbst hat diesen Standpunkt in seinem späten Werk relativiert, was von den meisten Vertretern der gouvernementalité aber nicht berücksichtigt wurde.[85]

Daß das Subjekt erst durch Herrschaft entsteht, ist unter anderem der Ausweg aus der Streichung der menschlichen Natur.[86] Das Subjekt ist Konstrukt – allein: mit der bloßen Streichung der menschlichen Natur hat man sich noch lange nicht von allen anthropologischen Grundannahmen befreit. Diese wirken umso stärker, je unbewußter sie sind. Hier handelt es sich um die Annahme der Formbarkeit des menschlichen Bewußtseins[87] und eines universellen Willens zu Regieren.[88]

Es scheint hier plausibler, wie gemeinhin der realistische Konstruktivismus im Gefolge von Piaget, von einem Prozeß der Selbstkonstruktion unter Bedingungen auszugehen. Gestaltet und manipuliert kann hier tatsächlich immer nur „at a distance“ werden, im Rahmen einer „Kontextsteuerung“ der Bedingungen. Die Genese der zur gouvernementalité passenden Subjektivität ist jedenfalls durch Manipulation allein nicht zu erklären. Wenn man Regierung im Sinne Foucaults gerade als das versteht, was sich zwischen den Technologien der Macht und den Technologien des Selbst abspielt, dann darf man letztere nicht einfach als Produkt der ersteren voraussetzen.[89]

Es ist dennoch einiges damit gewonnen, die Selbstdisziplin und -kontrolle der chronisch Kranken und chronisch Gesunden im Rahmen eines neoliberalen will to govern zu begreifen. Der Blick wird dadurch von den rein kalkulativen mikroökonomischen Aspekten auf normative gelenkt. Es mag sein, daß Individuen sich rational daran orientieren, wie sie sich eine möglichst lange Lebensspanne sichern können – nur: daß ihnen die Mittel für solche Kalkulationen bereitgestellt werden und daß die Situation so konstruiert ist, daß dies als ein erstrebenswertes Ziel gilt, ist nicht aus einem rationalen individuellen Kalkül zu schließen. Im Unterschied zu den früheren Studien zum healthism wird hier versucht, die Entwicklung in einen breiteren Kontext der die Gesellschaft durchdringenden Regierungstechniken zu stellen, und sie nicht einfach als Ergebnis ärztlicher Interessenpolitik[90] oder allgemeiner kapitalistischer Interessen[91] zu porträtieren.  Andererseits verweisen sie auf die autoritären Aspekte der life politics, die bei Giddens nicht nur als Folge von Emanzipation sondern auch als Grundlage neuer emanzipatorischer Bestrebungen erscheinen. Daß die konstatierte Remoralisierung des Alltagslebens sich selbst gegen Emanzipation kehren könnte kalkuliert Giddens nicht ein.[92]

Immer wieder klingt in den Studien zur gouvernementalité ein mögliches Motiv für die sonst vernachlässigte subjektive Gefolgschaft an, das im nächsten Abschnitt weiterverfolgt werden soll. In der Untersuchung von Selbsthilfeliteratur als Regierungstechnik, wo aufgrund der Tatsache, daß die Subjekte sich das Regierungsinstrument selbst im Buchladen kaufen müssen, besonders an deren Motive angeknüpft werden muß, deutet Rimke ein solches an:

“The underpinning of this framework presumes that psychologically healthy people, especially ‘good parents’, will confront and accept the pain of self-discipline and will thus create a sense of self-worth in themselves and their children.”[93]

Hier wird an das Motiv der Selbstachtung und der sozialen Anerkennung angeknüpft. Dieses ist der gouvernementalité aber lediglich Anschlußpunkt – die Entstehung und Ausformung wird in einen nicht analysierten Datenkranz verlegt. [94]

Während sich die Legitimität gesellschaftlicher Existenz immer noch sehr stark auf Arbeit und andere alltägliche Rollenverpflichtungen stützen dürfte, ist eine Quelle der Bestätigung und der Aufrechterhaltung von Identität in der Konsumsphäre zu suchen, die aufgrund ihrer hohen Sichtbarkeit eine entscheidende Rolle in der Vermittlung gesellschaftlicher Integration spielt. Der Konsum ist eine bevorzugte Sphäre der Konstitution und Expression sozialer Identität, in der eben nicht nur die Technologien der Macht (sprich: Manipulation durch Werbung) sondern Kämpfe um Distinktion und Anerkennung ausgetragen werden, die nicht von vornherein als funktional für die Regierung von Bevölkerungen gesehen werden können (aber auch nicht von vornherein als anarchisch.)

Chronischer Konsum: Gesundheit, Krankheit und consumerism

In den Forschungen zur Konsumgesellschaft haben sich in den letzten Jahren vor allem im angelsächsischen Raum Perspektiven aufgetan, die vielleicht helfen können, die Lücke der Genealogie der regierten Mentalität zu schließen.

Eine Betrachtung der chronischen Gesundheit und der chronischen Krankheit unter dem Blickwinkel der Konsumkultur liegt aus mehreren Gründen nahe:

Erstens handelt es sich bei der chronischen Gesundheit vor allem auch um einen Konsumstil – insbesondere dann, wenn man den Begriff des Konsums auf Aktivitäten ausdehnt, deren Rahmen käuflich erworben werden muß. So sind die diversen Praktiken wie Yoga, autogenes Training, Jogging etc. an sich kein Konsum – wohl aber dann wenn man sie als Teilnehmer eines Kurses, als Konsument von Büchern und Kassetten oder Träger eines aufwendigen Outfits betreibt. Kühn weist darauf hin, daß – obwohl Indizien vorliegen, daß auch die berufliche Tätigkeit den Gesundheitsstatus sehr stark beeinflußt – in den propagierten gesunden Lebensstilen meist nur die Privatsphäre und der Konsum thematisiert werden.[95]

Auch bei der chronischen Krankheit kann man argwöhnen, daß sich vieles in Richtung Konsumentenhaltung verändert. So ist schon allein durch die Wiederaufnahme alltäglicher Rollenverpflichtungen die Verpflichtung auf die Entkommerzialisierung des Verhältnisses zum Medizinsystem gelockert. Das im Parsonsschen Modell noch verpönte (und von Gesundheitsreformern immer wieder angegriffene) shopping around auf der Suche nach wirksameren medizinischen Leistungen, das sich nicht nur auf die etablierten Institutionen des Medizinsystems bezieht, sondern auch auf paramedizinische Leistungen wie die Alternativmedizin, auf Gesundheitsliteratur und -sendungen etc., ist nicht mehr so einfach zu delegitimieren.  Wenn man den „Konsum medizinischer Leistungen“, welcher der Akutmedizin so oft vorgeworfen wird,  nur im Schlucken von verschriebenen Medikamenten und im passiven Übersichergehenlassen von Eingriffen sieht, dann wird man wohl kaum gerade die Transformation der chronisch Kranken zu Mitproduzenten der medizinischen Leistung unter dem Blickwinkel des Konsums sehen. Wenn man aber nicht die Passivität, sondern die zurechenbare Wahl des Konsumenten als wesentlich ansieht, dann ist die Verschiebung zu den chronischen Krankheiten tatsächlich mit einer stärkeren Konsumhaltung verbunden. Dies vor allem auch, da die Entkommerzialisierung des Arzt-Patienten-Verhältnisses durch das shopping around in Frage gestellt wird.

Lange war es üblich, von einer Macht der kapitalistischen Produzenten über die Konsumenten auszugehen, in der letzteren mehr oder weniger diktiert wurde, was sie zu kaufen, was sie zu begehren hatten – man ging von einer Manipulation (und tatsächlich auch: Produktion) der Bedürfnisse aus – daher auch die Wahrnehmung des Konsumenten als passiv. Das Paradigma lieferten Horkheimer und Adornos Betrachtungen zur „Kulturindustrie“.[96]

Die neoliberale Ideologie der Macht des Konsumenten hat eine Veränderung der Perspektive ergeben. Während unter diesen Vorzeichen zunächst eine Verschiebung von Produzentenmacht, die den Konsum bestimmt, zu Konsumentenmacht, die über die Produktion herrscht, diagnostiziert wurde,[97] haben neuere Untersuchungen hervorgehoben, daß es sich bei Konsum und Produktion um ein Wechselspiel handelt, in dem sich zu keiner Zeit die eine Sphäre auf die andere reduzieren ließ, aber auch keine unabhängig von der anderen bestehen kann.[98]

Auf der Basis der historischen Untersuchungen zur Entwicklung des Konsums zeigt Colin Campbell die Entwicklung einer romantischen Ethik des Konsums auf, die eine notwendige Parallelerscheinung der protestantischen Ethik der Produktion darstellte. Diese romantische Ethik ermöglichte jene Form von Hedonismus, die eine unabdingbare Voraussetzung für das Funktionieren der kapitalistischen Warenwirtschaft darstellt. Der traditionelle Hedonismus, der auf der Erzeugung und Befriedigung mehr oder weniger körperlicher Freuden und Genüsse basiert, hat enge Grenzen; auf ihn ist deshalb keine endlose Vermehrung der Warenproduktion zu bauen. Um dies zu bewerkstelligen, muß ein autonomer Hedonismus entstehen, dem es möglich ist, alle Arten von emotionalen Zuständen, Imaginationen etc. zu genießen.

“Modern hedonism presents all individuals with the possibility of being their own despot, exercising total control over the stimuli they experience, and hence the pleasure they receive. Unlike traditional hedonism, however, this not gained solely, or even primarily, through the manipulation of objects and events in the world, but through a degree of control over their meaning. In addition, the modern hedonist possesses the very special power to conjure up stimuli in the absence of any externally generated sensations. This control is achieved through the power of imagination, and provides infinitely greater possibilities for the maximization of pleasurable experiences than was available under traditional, realistic hedonism to even the most powerful of potentates. This derives not merely from the fact that there are virtually no restrictions upon the faculty of imagination, but also from the fact that it is completely within the hedonist’s own control. It is this highly rationalized form of self-illusory hedonism which characterizes modern pleasure-seeking.”[99]

Dieser autonome Hedonismus bildet die Grundlage, auf der die von Baudrillard beschriebene Verschiebung zum Konsum von Zeichenwerten[100] und die von Haug beklagte “Warenästhetik”[101] überhaupt erst Anklang finden können.

Die hier interessierende Wendung ist, daß dieser autonom-hedonistische Konsum einen moralischen Aspekt hat, nämlich den, daß sich im zugrundeliegenden Geschmacksurteil die charakterliche Qualität der Person ausdrückt. [102] In der Konsumwahl zeigt sich die Authentizität der Person, die Fähigkeit, sich selbst zu verwirklichen und auszudrücken. Die Unfähigkeit dies zu tun, das Angewiesensein auf Entscheidungshilfen (und sei es nur rationale Kalkulation von Nutzen), entlarvt den nicht authentischen Charakter.  Wie in der protestantischen, so ist auch in der romantischen Ethik das Ergebnis des Tuns an sich zweitrangig. Die eigentliche Funktion ist, das Individuum als erwähltes oder wertvolles zu bestätigen.

Daß sich das empirisch belegen läßt, zeichnet sich in laufender Forschung ab. Es zeigt sich, daß Gesundheitskonsum die charakterliche Qualität der Person dokumentiert – und weniger die Rationalität der einzelnen Handlung bzw. der Konsumwahl. Dabei wird ein “Geschmack für Gesundheit” betont,[103] der gegen die sonst populäre Wahrnehmung geht, nur ungesunde Dinge könnten wirklich Freude bereiten. Ungesunde Lebensstile gelten dabei als Ausdruck von Inkompetenz und Unbildung einerseits und Trägheit andererseits.

Auch wenn zum Beispiel in den USA (und wahrscheinlich mittlerweile auch anderswo) Übergewichtige Probleme haben, einen Job zu erhalten, dann nicht einfach deshalb, weil der Arbeitgeber Angst vor häufigen Krankheitsausfällen hätte – das Übergewicht wird schlicht als Zeichen der Charakterschwäche angesehen. Ähnliches gilt für die – mittlerweile wegen Erfolglosigkeit eingestellten – Antiraucherkampagnen der letzten Jahrzehnte, in denen nicht nur auf die Schädlichkeit des Rauchens hingewiesen wurde, sondern auch darauf, daß dem Rauchen irgendwelche Persönlichkeitsdefizite zugrunde lägen.[104]

In der Konvergenz von Geschmack und Gesundheit bei den ausgewählten Produkten bestätigen sich chronisch Gesunde, daß sie, indem sie intuitiv richtig wählen, eine innere Tendenz zur Gesundheit haben. Durch die Verbindung der von der Ethik der Produktion geforderten Gesundheit als Arbeitsfähigkeit mit der von der Ethik des Konsums geforderten Genußfähigkeit lösen sie so für sich das ethische Dilemma moderner kapitalistischer Gesellschaften.[105]

Die Gesundheit wird ihnen dabei zum Charaktermerkmal, zum Teil der Identität, wie bei chronisch Kranken die jeweilige Krankheit. In der chronischen Gesundheit zeigt sich das wahrhaft „romantische“ Individuum dadurch, daß eine Verbindung zu den natürlichen Bedürfnissen des unverfälschten Selbst – das heute unauflöslich mit Körperlichkeit verknüpft ist – wiederhergestellt und aufrechterhalten wird. Dargestellt wird ein authentischer Charakter. Rosalind Coward beschreibt die zugrundeliegende Ideologie:

“Indeed in these accounts there is little space for understanding any ‘unhealthy’ activity – be it eating, how we choose to sit, or how we behave – as anything other than a distortion of the natural or proper way foisted on us by a society which has got wildly out of touch with nature. Thus deviations from a so-called healthy way of doing things are never interpreted as real choices, leaving aside the symbolic significance for the individual in question. They are always seen as learned and conditioned responses of unfortunates cut off from a close and automatic relation with the body.”[106]

Daß es sich dabei um einen Konsum von Zeichenwerten handelt, zeigt sich einmal darin, daß gesunde Produkte und Dienstleistungen nur dann gekauft werden, wenn ihre Wirksamkeit kulturell plausibel ist:[107] Auch wenn beispielsweise wissenschaftliche Belege für die Überlegenheit gekochter Tomaten über rohe bei der Krebsprävention existieren, wird bei den chronisch Gesunden das Ketchup wohl kaum den Tomatensalat verdrängen – kulturell gilt eben immer noch, daß Rohkost von Gott und der Kochtopf vom Teufel sei. Zum anderen zeigt ein Blick auf die Masse an immer neuen Erkenntnissen über den Gesundheitswert und –unwert von Lebensmitteln und Tätigkeiten und auf die immer neuen Wellen alternativer Gesundheitspräparate (wie jüngst südafrikanischer Rotbuschtee oder ägyptischer Schwarzkümmel), daß es weniger um die Etablierung eines stabilen optimalen Musters geht als um einen Markt, der mit immer neuen Zeichenwerten bedient wird, deren “objektiver Nutzen”  individuell kaum noch zu überprüfen ist, sondern durch auf kulturelle Muster zurückgreifende Warenästhetik bestimmt wird[108].

Mit Bourdieu kann die unbewußte Kompetenz bei der Wahl gesunder Konsumgüter – der erwähnte “Geschmack für Gesundheit” – als zentrales Element der Distinktion gesehen werden.[109] Gerade dadurch, daß sie nicht bewußt ist und der Willenskontrolle entzogen, kann sie als untrüglicher Indikator in der Klassifikation eingesetzt werden. Williams zeigt, daß die von Bourdieu entwickelten Kategorien sich im Gesundheitskonsum niederschlagen.[110]

Allerdings, darauf weist Honneth hin, [111] bringt reine Distinktion, ohne die Perspektive, daß diese Distinktion dann auch anerkannt wird, wenig ein. Die Größe, um die es hier wesentlich geht, ist nicht die Regierung des Selbst – diese signalisiert lediglich, daß man ein achtenswertes Individuum ist – sondern daß dies sozial anerkannt werden muß. Vor diesem Hintergrund ist der chronisch gesunde Konsum als Distinktions- sowie als Anerkennungsunternehmen zu verstehen. Regierung greift dann auf die materiellen und symbolischen Ressourcen der Anerkennung zu. In der Logik der Distinktion und Anerkennung, die der Konsumethik zugrundeliegt, ist also die Bedingung für das Funktionieren von gouvernementalité zu suchen. Regierung auf Distanz manipuliert die Ressourcen der Anerkennung, wie eben das “Gesundheitswissen”.

Es ist klar, daß im Unterschied zu chronischer Gesundheit die chronische Krankheit, wenn überhaupt, dann nur sehr begrenzt als Konsumsstil interpretiert werden kann. Williams weist die Sicht der Postmodernen zurück, die chronische Krankheit als einen unter vielen möglichen Lebensstilen (und damit unweigerlich auch: Konsumstilen) verstehen. Diese beruht auf einer körperlosen Sicht, bzw. auf einer Umdefinierung des Körpers zum bloßen Text.[112] Trotzdem bleibt die dem consumerism zugrundeliegende Ideologie nicht ohne Folgen für die Wahrnehmung chronischer Krankheit.

Oben wurde schon darauf hingewiesen, daß chronische Gesundheit insofern auf chronische Krankheit zurückwirkt, als durch einen chronisch gesunden Lebensstil die Verantwortlichkeit der chronisch Kranken für ihr Kranksein unterstrichen wird. Wenn nun gesunder Lebensstil ein Ausdruck des Charakters ist, dann kann den chronisch Kranken und Kranken überhaupt leicht ein charakterliches Defizit unterstellt werden, wie Sontag festhält:

“With the modern diseases (once TB, now cancer), the romantic idea that the disease expresses the character is invariably extended to assert that the character causes the disease – because it has not expressed itself.”[113]

Dieses verstärkte vicitim-blaming aber ist nicht die einzige Konsequenz für die chronische Krankheit. Es werden aus dieser Haltung heraus auch bestimmte Erwartungen an chronisch Kranke entwickelt, die über die oben behandelte Normalisierung hinausgehen. Die Rückkehr zur Arbeit oder ganz allgemein die Ausübung der alltäglichen Rollen reicht nicht mehr hin. Was Plessner in seiner Rezeption noch als Chance der Rollenförmigkeit moderner sozialer Integration sah: hinter den Rollen als ganzer Mensch, der nicht auf die Rollen reduzierbar ist, zu existieren,[114]  ist eingeholt von der Verpflichtung auf ein authentisches Selbst. Die verbreitete romantische Kritik an der Rollentheorie als Festschreibung der Entfremdung und der gelebte Widerstand dagegen ist zur Norm mutiert – Greco faßt dies als Gebot des Selbstseins, in dem selbstlose Konformität, Angewiesenheit auf Normen, pathologisiert wird.[115] Gerade im Hinblick darauf, daß der Verlust des Selbst aus verschiedenen Gründen wie sozialer Isolation, Stigmatisierung, eingeschränkter Fähigkeit der Rollenausübung chronisch Kranke besonders bedroht,[116] ist diese Erwartung eine besonders schwer zu erfüllende. Ihre Wurzeln hat sie – wie die Ethik des consumerism – in der Romantik. So war die Tuberkulose als die romantische Krankheit schlechthin auch eine der ersten chronischen Krankheiten im heutigen Sinn. [117] Ironischerweise nannte man sie im Englischen auch “consumption” – sie war dabei nicht nur eine Krankheit, die den Körper verzehrte sondern darin auch Ausdruck eines Selbstkonsums des romantischen Individuums, selbst Konsumobjekt, das zur Expression des authentischen Selbst und zugleich der sozialen Distinktion diente wie die Kleidung:

“Both clothes (the outer garment of the body) and illness (a kind of interior décor of the body) become tropes for new attitudes toward the self.”[118]

Die prominenteste Version dieser Erwartungen heute ist wohl die, die „Krankheit als Chance” zu sehen. Hier greift die gleiche Logik der Bewährung und es ist kein Zufall, daß gerade aus der mit der chronischen Gesundheit liierten Alternativmedizin diese Forderung am lautesten vorgebracht wird. Edgar Heim, Arzt und Psychotherapeut, vermerkt,

„… daß Krankheit nie eine Krise allein, sondern immer eine Chance zugleich ist. Die Zuwendung zu neuen Lebensinhalten ist vielfach verbürgt. Sie ist besonders eindrücklich bei Kranken, die gewissermaßen dem Tod ins Auge geschaut haben, wie Patienten nach einem Herzstillstand, deren innere Erschütterung sich durchaus auch psychisch positiv, im Sinne einer wiedergefundenen Glaubenshaltung, auswirken kann. Wir wissen auch, daß Krankheit kreative Möglichkeiten anregen oder vertiefen kann.“ [119]

Das könnte natürlich zunächst als bloße Feststellung so stehen bleiben. Eine solche wird aber notorisch mit der Erwartung verbunden, daß diese Chance gefälligst auch genutzt werden soll. Nachdem übertriebene, meist unrealistische Erwartungen (wie etwa in der Beschwörung der ehemals poliokranken australischen Schwimmweltmeisterin Jane Gould durch Heim) relativiert werden und damit gezeigt wird, daß kleinere Ziele für jeden erreichbar seien, kommt der Arzt und Medizinhistoriker Dietrich von Engelhardt doch zu einem atemberaubenden Ergebnis:

„Man muß sich nicht als Querschnittsgelähmter wie der Amerikaner Michael King 9000 Kilometer durch die USA allein vor das Capitol in Washington gerollt haben, um sich in seinem Selbstbewußtsein gestärkt zu fühlen; Kings Überzeugung hat aber ihre tiefe Wahrheit: ‚Jeder bestimmt selber, wie sehr er behindert ist.’“[120]

Somit ist – wenn nicht gar die Tatsache der Krankheit selbst – aber doch die Art, wie man damit leben kann, ganz in der Verfügung des Patienten. Und:

„Patienten haben in der Bewältigung der Krankheit ihre Persönlichkeit entwickelt, ein tieferes Verhältnis zur Wirklichkeit gewonnen und auch zu neuen Formen der Freizeit und der Arbeit gefunden.“[121]

Wer dies nicht schafft, versagt vor der von der Krankheit gebotenen Chance, deren Wahrnehmung von Engelhardt an anderer Stelle sogar in einen Pflichtenkatalog des Kranken aufnimmt.[122] Inwieweit der Patient nun den Anforderungen gerecht wird, hängt von allen möglichen Umständen ab, deren wesentlichster aber die Persönlichkeit des Patienten ist:

„Die Persönlichkeit des Kranken bestimmt bei aller Abhängigkeit von äußeren Bedingungen entscheidend den Umgang mit der Krankheit. Diese Persönlichkeit existiert bereits vor der Krankheit (prämorbide Persönlichkeit), verändert sich aber auch mit und während der Krankheit.“[123]

Mit solchen Annahmen kann man dann im Umkehrschluß die Persönlichkeit des Kranken aus seinem Umgang mit der Krankheit heraus beurteilen, wird der Umgang mit der Krankheit – und hier vor allem die Frage, ob der Betroffene sie als „Chance“ sieht – zum Prüfstein des Charakters.

Autonomer Hedonismus besteht ja gerade auch darin, auch noch “negative” Emotionen und Imaginationen konsumieren zu können. Die romantische Erwartung an den Kranken ist, die Krankheit zum Konsumobjekt umzudeuten. Genau darin besteht die „Chance“ der Krankheit: Wie der romantische Konsum, so soll auch die romantische Krankheit zur Verwirklichung des Selbst dienen. Man soll die Krankheit als Identitätserweiterung oder -vertiefung regelrecht „genießen“ wie etwa einen Roman oder einen Film, bei denen ja auch „negative“ Emotionen konsumiert werden. Tatsächlich kann man ja auch Krankheit als Literatur genießen – von Manns Zauberberg über Solschenyzins Krebsstation bis hin zu den neueren Erfahrungsberichten Kranker und Sterbender. Das Ideal von selbsterlebter Krankheit als Konsumobjekt tritt in folgender Behauptung von Engelhardts hervor:

„Nicht wenige unter den Kranken sehen zwar die Einschränkungen und Belastungen durch das Kranksein, wollen aber die gewonnenen Erfahrungen nicht missen, zögern bei dem Gedanken an eine Rückkehr in den früheren Zustand.“[124]

Diese beispielhaften Kranken wollen ihre Krankheit sowenig ungeschehen machen wie man einen schauerlichen Gruselroman ungelesen oder eine beschwerliche Abenteuerreise ungeschehen machen möchte: auch extreme Erlebnisse können konsumiert werden. Bezeichnend ist die Objektivierung der zu konsumierenden Krankheit, die sich darin ausdrückt, daß die Kranken „zwar die Einschränkungen und Belastungen sehen“ – als hätten sie eine Möglichkeit sie zu übersehen! – aber diese nur Akzidenzien einer an sich wertvollen Erfahrung sind.

Daß die Erwartung, Krankheit zu konsumieren, auch unter dem Aspekt der Vermarktung zu sehen ist, wird deutlich, wenn man sich die verschiedenen Angebote an chronisch Kranke ansieht. So wirbt das Programm „Traditionelle Chinesische Medizin“ der Kurverwaltung Bad Neuenahr:

„Gesundheit bedeutet nach taoistischer chinesischer Philosophie das harmonische Gleichgewicht aller Kräfte. So sind Krankheiten das Resultat einer Störung der Harmonie und fließender Lebensenergie im Körper. Diese zu beheben und das Gleichgewicht der Kräfte wiederherzustellen, ist Ziel aller Therapien. Dabei wird die Krankheit als Chance einer Änderung der Lebensgewohnheiten und Möglichkeit zur persönlichen Neuorientierung gesehen.“[125]

Krankheit als Chance wird also regelrecht verkauft: sei es als Aspekt eines Rehabilitationsangebots,[126] sei es als Lebenshilfeliteratur.[127] Unabhängig davon, ob dieses Konzept tatsächlich nur eine Zumutung oder nicht doch für viele echte Lebenshilfe bedeutet; es ist ein Indiz dafür, daß chronische Krankheit zum Konsumstil geworden ist. Nicht, daß sich die Mehrheit der chronisch Kranken so sehen – aber die Wahrnehmung scheint nicht zuletzt durch die Verbreitung der Ideologien der chronischen Gesundheit in diese Richtung zu gehen.

Solche Erwartungen sind für chronisch Kranke kaum zu erfüllen. Wenn sie sich weiter verfestigen, wird es weniger zu einer postmodernen Anerkennung chronischer Krankheit als differenter Existenzweise, als einer von vielen möglichen Erzählungen, die alle gleiche Legitimität haben. Es wird nicht dazu kommen, daß vor dem Hintergrund des Brüchigwerdens jeder Biographie chronische Krankheit als biographischer Bruch nicht mehr so einschneidend ist (so Kelly und Field) .[128] Vielmehr ist zu befürchten, daß Erwartungen einer autonomen Flexibilität, eine bejahten, selbstgesteuerten Brüchigkeit, aufgebaut werden, die von chronisch Kranken schon allein deshalb nicht zu erfüllen sind, da ihnen in einem Maße der Alltag vorgegeben ist, das sich beim besten Willen nicht mit dem postmodernen Flanieren durch flottierende Erlebniswelten vereinbaren läßt.

Auch unter dem Blickwinkel des consumerism bleiben Fragen offen. Beispielsweise die, worin sich das Bedürfnis gründet, Distinktion und Anerkennung anzustreben. Nichtsdestotrotz werden aus diesem Blickwinkel einige der Verhaltensweisen verständlich, die zur Regierbarkeit der Individuen führen.

So wie durch die Funktionalität nicht erklärt ist, wie es zu einem bestimmten Verhaltensmuster kommt, so ist aber auch durch die Genealogie die Erklärung nicht befriedigend abgeschlossen. Weber macht für die Kontinuierung der protestantischen Ethik in einer säkularisierten Welt die Auslese durch kapitalistische Betriebe verantwortlich. Eine solche Instanz der Auslese stellt der consumerism nicht bereit.

Um eine Kontinuierung der romantischen Ethik in der Moderne zu begründen, wäre nötig, sie mit den strukturellen Bedingungen der Geldvermittlung des Lebens im Kapitalismus in Zusammenhang zu bringen, wie sie schon von Simmel analysiert wurden. Es wäre dann zu zeigen, wie die Logik der Anerkennung unter diesen Bedingungen funktioniert, wie die romantische Ethik möglicherweise durch eine strukturelle Romantik des Geldes perpetuiert wird. Das zu eruieren würde den Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit sprengen.

Schluß

Anhand der gouvernementalité wird deutlich, daß man – wenn chronische Gesundheit ein Phänomen der Regierung ist – vielleicht chronische Krankheit trotz der unmittelbaren Rückkoppelung an somatische Folgen der Nichteinhaltung des Regimes als soziales Konstrukt, als Regierung verstehen kann. Wenn man weniger auf die Technologien der Macht als auf die des Selbst sieht und chronische Gesundheit dabei als Konsumstil interpretiert, werden für das Verständnis chronischer Krankheit in der Konsumgesellschaft verheerende Folgen deutlich. Schon der Druck der „produktionistischen“ Ethik stellte für chronisch Kranke ein Problem dar in einer Gesellschaft, die Arbeitsfähigkeit fast als Synonym der Gesundheit setzt. Doch auch denjenigen, denen es gelingt in die Arbeitsrolle zurückzukehren, wird durch das chronisch gesunde Ideal das Leben erschwert. Bei allem berechtigten Vorbehalt sei hier der Gebrauch von Krankheit als Metapher gestattet: Chronische Gesundheit lebt parasitär von chronischer Krankheit.

Erstens bezieht sie ihre Legitimität und ihre moralische Energie aus dem Verweis auf chronische Krankheit. Chronische Krankheit und die Unterstellung eines kausalen Zusammenhangs zwischen ihr und einem nicht chronisch gesunden Lebenswandel bilden die unerschütterliche argumentative Grundlage für die Forderung nach chronischer Gesundheit. Zweitens bezieht sich auch die Rigidität der geforderten Lebensführung, nämlich das Regime als Diät, präventive Rehabilitation und präventive Therapie, auf die für die Bewältigung chronischer Krankheit entwickelten Maßnahmen. Drittens schadet chronische Gesundheit auch den Betroffenen chronischer Krankheit, indem sie ermöglicht, daß die herausgestrichene und gelebte Verantwortlichkeit für zukünftige Krankheit die chronisch Kranken unter Legitimationsdruck setzt, bei ihnen Schuldgefühle auslöst. Viertens werden durch die auf Kosten chronisch Kranker erzielten Anerkennungs- und Distinktionsgewinne als eine vorbildliche Lebensführung in den Raum gestellt, Maßstäbe aufgestellt, denen chronisch Kranke – die mit Mühe nach so etwas wie „Normalität“ streben – nicht erfüllen können.

Literatur

Nicholas Abercrombie: The Privilege of the Producer, in: R. Keat, N. Abercrombie (eds): Enterprise Culture, London: Routledge 1990, pp.171-85

Vilhelm Aubert, Sheldon L. Messinger: The Criminal and the Sick, in: E. Freidson, J. Lorber (eds); Medical Men and Their Work, Chicago / New York: Aldine-Atherton 1972, pp.288-308

Eva Barlösius: Soziologie des Essens. Eine sozial- und kulturwissenschaftliche Einführung in die Ernährungsforschung, Weinheim/München: Juventa 1999.

Jean Baudrillard: La société de consommation. Ses mythes, ses structures, Paris: Denoël 1970

Michael Bury: The Sociology of Chronic Illness: A Review of Research and Prospects, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.13 (1991), pp.451-68

Michael Calnan, Simon Williams: Style of Life and Salience of Health: An Exploratory Study of Health Related Practices in Households from Differing Socio-Economic Circumstances, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.13 (1991), pp.506-29

Colin Campbell: The Romantic Ethic and the Spirit of Modern Consumerism, Oxford: Blackkwell 1987

Robert Castel: From Dangerousness to Risk, in: G. Burchell, C. Gordon, P. Miller (eds.): The Foucault Effect. Studies in Governmentality, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf 1991, pp.281-98

Kathy Charmaz: Loss of Self: A Fundamental Form of Suffering in the Chronically Ill, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.5 (1983), pp.168-95

Kathy Charmaz: Experiencing Chronic Illness, in: G.L. Albrecht, R. Fitzpatrick, S.C. Scrimshaw (eds): Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine, London: SAGE 2000, pp.277-92

Marc Chrysanthou: Transparency  and Selfhood: Utopia and the Informed Body, in: Social Science & Medicine, Vol.54 (2002), pp.469-79.

Rose Laub Coser: Complexity of roles as a Seedbed of Individual Autonomy, in: Lewis A. Coser (ed.): The Idea of Social Structure. Papers in Honor of Robert K. Merton, New York/Chicago/San Francisco/ Atlanta: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1975, pp.237-263

Rosalind Coward: The Whole Truth. The Myth of Alternative Health, London/Boston: Faber 1989.

Robert Crawford: Healthism and the Medicalization of Everyday Life, in: International Journal of Health Services Vol.10 (1980), pp.365-88.

Robert Crawford: Cultural Influences on Prevention and the Emergence of a New Health Consciousness, in: N. D. Weinstein (ed.): Taking Care. Understanding and Encouraging Self-protective Behavior, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1987, pp.95-113.

Robert Crawford: The Ritual of Health Promotion, in: S.J. Williams, J. Gabe, M. Calnan (eds): Health, Medicine and Society. Key Theories, Future Agendas, London / New York: Routledge 2000, pp.219-35

Barbara Cruikshank: Revolutions Within: Self-Government and Self-Esteem, in: A. Bury, Th. Osborne, N. Rose (eds): Foucault and Political Reason. Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and Rationalities of Government, London: UCL Press 1996, pp.231-51

Hans-Ulrich Deppe: Zur geschichtlichen Dimension in der Medizinischen Soziologie, in:  Id., H.-U. Deppe, M. Regus (ed.): Seminar: Medizin, Gesellschaft, Geschichte. Beiträge zur Entwicklungsgeschichte der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1975, pp.11-28

Mary Douglas: How Institutions Think, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul 1986

Michel Foucault: Afterword. The Subject and Power, in: H.L. Dreyfus, P. Rabinow: Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1983, pp.208-26

Michel Foucault: On the Genealogy of Ethics, in: H. L. Dreyfus, P. Rabinow: Michel Foucault. Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, 2nd Edition, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1983, pp.229-52

Michel Foucault: The Ethic of Care for the Self as a Practice of Freedom, An Interview With Michel Foucault on January 20, 1984 conducted by Raúl Fornet-Betancourt, Helmut Becker, Alfredo Gomez-Müller, translated by J. D. Gauthier, in: Philosophy & Social Criticism, Vol.12 (1987), pp.112-32.

Michel Foucault: The Political Technology of Individuals, in: L.H. Martin, H. Gutman, P.H. Hutton (eds.): Technologies of the Self. A Seminar with Michel Foucault, London: Tavistock 1988, pp.145-62

Michel Foucault: Governmentality, in: G. Burchell, C. Gordon, P. Miller (eds.): The Foucault Effect. Studies in Governmentality, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf 1991, pp.87-104

Eliot Freidson: Der Ärztestand : berufs- und wissenschaftssoziologische Durchleuchtung einer Profession, Stuttgart : Enke 1979

Uta Gerhard: Patientenkarrieren. Eine medizinsoziologische Studie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1986

Uta Gerhardt: Idealtypische Analyse von Statusbiographien bei chronisch Kranken, in: id.: Gesellschaft und Gesundheit. Begründung der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1991, pp.9-60

Uta Gerhard: Rollentheorie und gesundheitsbezogene Interaktion in der Medizinsoziologie Talcott Parsons’, in: id.: Gesellschaft und Gesundheit. Begründung der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1991, pp.162-202

Anthony Giddens: Power, the dialectic of control and class structuration, in: id., G. Mackenzie: Social Class and the Division of  Labour. Essays in Honour of Ilya Neustadt, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1982, pp.29-45

Anthony Giddens: Modernity and Self-Identity. Self and Society in the Late Modern Age, Cambridge: Polity Press 1991

Barry Glassner: Fit for Postmodern Selfhood, in: H. S. Becker, M. McCall (Hrsg.): Symbolic Interaction and Cultural Studies, Chicago und London: University of Chicago Press 1990, p.215-43

Monica Greco: Psychosomatic Subjects and the ‘Duty to Be Well’: Personal Agency within Medical Rationality, in: Economy & Society, Vol.22 (1993), pp.357-72

Monica Greco: Homo Vacuus. Alexithymie und das neoliberale Gebot des Selbstseins, in: U. Bröckling, S. Krasmann, Th. Lemke (eds): Gouvernementalität der Gegenwart. Studien zur Ökonomisierung des Sozialen, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 2000, p.265-85

Wolfgang Fritz Haug: Zur Ästhetik von Manipulation (1963), in: id.: Warenästhetik, Sexualität und Herrschaft. Gesammelte Aufsätze, Frankfurt am Main: Fischer 1972, pp.31-45

Wolfgang Fritz Haug: Kritik der Warenästhetik, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1971

Edgar Heim: Krankheit als Krise und Chance, Stuttgart/Berlin: Kreuz Verlag 1980

Claudine Herzlich: Health and Illness. A Social Psychological Analysis, London and New York: Academic Press 1973

Claudine Herzlich, Janine Pierret: Illness and Self in Society, Baltimore und London: John Hopkins University Press 1987

Axel Honneth: Die zerrissene Welt der symbolischen Formen. zum kultursoziogischen Werk Pierre Bourdieus, in: Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie Vol.36 (1984), pp.147-64

Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno: Dialektik der Aufklärung, Frankfurt am Main: S.Fischer 1969

Patrick Hutton: Foucault, Freud and the Technologies of the Self, in: L.H. Martin, H. Gutman, P.H. Hutton: (eds): Technologies of the Self. A Seminar with Michel Foucault, London: Tavistock 1988, pp.121-44

Ivan Illich: Medical Nemesis. The Expropriation of Health, London: Calder & Boyars 1975

Ray Jobling: The Experience of Psoriasis Under Treatment, in: R. Anderson, M. Bury (eds): Living with Chronic Illness. The Experience of Patients and their Families, London: Unwin Hyman 1988.

Michael P. Kelly, David Field: Conceptualising Chronic Illness, in: D. Field, S. Taylor (eds): Sociological Perspectives on Health, Illness and Health Care, Oxford: Blackwell 1998, pp.3-20.

Gina Kolata: Days Off Are Not Allowed, Weight Experts Argue, in: The New York Times, October 18, 2000

Wolfgang Krohn: Funktionen der Moralkommunikation, in: Soziale Systeme, Vol.5 (1999), pp.313-38

Hagen Kühn: Healthismus. Eine Analyse der Präventionspolitik und Gesundheitsförderung in den U.S.A., Berlin: Edition Sigma 1993

Hagen Kühn: Eine neue Gesundheitsmoral? Anmerkungen zur lebensstilbezogenen Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung, in: W. Schlicht, H.H. Dickhuth (eds.): Gesundheit für alle. Fiktion oder Realität? Schorndorf: Hoffmann / Stuttgart: Schattauer 1999, pp.205-24

Scott Lash, John Urry: Economies of Signs and Spaces, London: SAGE 1994

Thomas Lemke: Neoliberalismus, Staat und Selbsttechnologien. Ein kritischer Überblick über die governmentality studies, in: Politische Vierteljahresschrift, Vol.41 (2000), No.1, pp.31-47

Frank Lettke, Willy H. Eirmbter, Alois Hahn, Claudia Hennes, Rüdiger Jacob: Krankheit und Gesellschaft. Zur Bedeutung von Krankheitsbildern und Gesundheitsvorstellungen für die Prävention, Konstanz: Universitätsverlag Konstanz 1999

Niklas Luhmann: Der medizinische Code, in id.: Soziologische Aufklärung 5. Konstruktivistische Perspektiven, Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag 1990, pp.183-95

Deborah Lupton: Foucault and the Medicalisation Critique, in: A. Peterson, R. Bunton (eds): Foucault, Health and Medicine, London: Routledge 1997, pp.94-110

Deborah Lupton: Food, Risk, and Subjectivity, in: S.J. Williams, J. Gabe, M. Calnan (eds): Health, Medicine and Society. Key Theories, Future Agendas, London / New York: Routledge 2000, pp.205-18

Gerd Marstedt, Ulrich Mergner: Chronische Krankheit und Rehabilitation: Zur institutionellen Regulierung von Statuspassagen, in: L. Leisering, B. Geisler, U. Mergner, U. Raber-Kleberg (eds.): Moderne Lebensläufe im Wandel, Weinheim: Deutscher Studien Verlag 1993, pp. 221-48

Karl Marx: Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Erster Band, Hamburg 1867, MEGA II,5, 1,  Berlin 1983

Stephen Mennell: On the Civilizing of Appetite, in: M. Featherstone, M. Hepworth, B.S. Turner (eds): The Body: Social Process and Cultural Theory, London: Sage 1991

Daniel Miller: A Theory of Shopping, Cambridge: Polity 1998

Sarah Nettleton: Governing the Risky Self. How to Become Healthy, Wealthy and Wise, in: A. Petersen, R. Bunton (eds.): Foucault, Health and Medicine, London: Routledge 1997, pp.207-22

Talcott Parsons: The Social System, London: Routledge 1951

Talcott Parsons: Psychoanalysis and the Social Structure, in: id.: Essays in Sociological Theory (Revised Edition), Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press 1958, pp.336-47

Talcott Parsons: Definitions of Health and Illness in the Light of American Values and Social Structure, in: id.: Social Structure and Personality, Glencoe: Free Press 1964, pp.257-91

Talcott Parsons: Some Theoretical Considerations Bearing on the Field of Medical Sociology, in: id.: Social Structure and Personality, Glencoe Ill.: Free Press 1964, pp.325-58

Talcott Parsons: The Sick Role and the Role of the Physician Reconsidered, in: id. Action Theory and the Human Condition, New York: Free Press 1978, pp.17-34

Talcott Parsons: Health and Disease: A Sociological and Action Perspective, in: id.: Action Theory and the Human Condition, New York: Free Press 1978, pp.66-81

Helmuth Plessner: Die Frage nach der Conditio humana, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1962

Heidi Marie Rimke: Governing Citizens through Self-help Literature, in: Cultural Studies Vol.14 (2000), pp.61-78

Nikolas Rose: Governing the Soul. The Shaping of the Private Self, London / New York: Routledge 1990

Nikolas Rose, Peter Miller: Political power beyond the State: problematics of government, in: British Journal of Sociology, Vol.43 (1992), pp.173-205

Nikolas Rose: Government, Authority and Expertise in Advanced Liberalism, in: Economy and Society, Vol.22 (1993), pp.287-299

Don Slater: Consumer Culture and Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press 1997

Susan Sontag: Illness as a Metaphor, London: Allen Lane 1979

Anselm L. Strauss, Barney G. Glaser: Chronic Illness and the Quality of Life, Saint Louis: Mosby 1975

Simon J. Williams: Theorising Class, Health and Lifestyles: Can Bourdieu Help Us?, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.17 (1995), pp.577-604

Simon J. Williams: Chronic illness as biographical disruption or biographical disruption as chronic illness? Reflections on a core concept, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.22 (2000), pp.40-67

Georg Vobruba: Prävention durch Selbstkontrolle, in: M.M. Wambach (ed.): Der Mensch als Risiko, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1983, pp.29-48

Dietrich von Engelhardt: Mit der Krankheit leben. Grundlagen und Perspektiven der Copingstruktur des Patienten, Heidelberg: Verlag für Medizin Dr. Ewald Fischer 1986

Jürgen von Troschke: Das Rauchen. Genuß und Risiko, Basel: Birkhäuser 1987

Irving Kenneth Zola: Medicine as an Institution of Social Control, in: P. Conrad, R. Kern (eds): The Sociology of Health and Illness. Critical Perspectives, New York: St. Martin’s 1981, pp.511-27

* Das Paper bezieht sich zum Teil auf erste Ergebnisse eines im Rahmen des DFG-GK “Lebensstile, soziale Differenzen und Gesundheitsförderung” an der Universität Tübingen geförderten Forschungsprojekts “Geld und Gesundheit – Konsum als Transformation von Geld in Moral.”

[1] Claudine Herzlich: Health and Illness. A Social Psychological Analysis, London and New York: Academic Press 1973, p.9.

[2] Parsons hat später angemerkt, daß er den Begriff der Devianz vor allem wegen der Rolle des motivationalen Elements in der Krankheit verwendet. Die Folge, für die Gesellschaft Desintegration, für das Individuum Adaptionsproblem, dürften allerdings auch bei nichtmotivierter Abweichung die gleichen bleiben. (cf. Talcott Parsons: The Sick Role and the Role of the Physician Reconsidered, in: id. Action Theory and the Human Condition, New York: Free Press 1978, pp.17-34, p.19.)

[3] Talcott Parsons: The Social System, London: Routledge 1951, p.440.

[4] Natürlich nicht in allen Fällen. Der Verdacht der Simulation ist in unterschiedlichen Situationen unterschiedlich plausibel: “… any situation in which an individual stands to gain from withdrawal is such as to render suspect his claim to illness.” (Vilhelm Aubert, Sheldon L. Messinger: The Criminal and the Sick, in: E. Freidson, J. Lorber (eds); Medical Men and Their Work, Chicago / New York: Aldine-Atherton 1972, pp.288-308, p.292)

[5] Uta Gerhard: Rollentheorie und gesundheitsbezogene Interaktion in der Medizinsoziologie Talcott Parsons’, in: id.: Gesellschaft und Gesundheit. Begründung der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1991, pp.162-202, p.171sq.

[6] Talcott Parsons: Health and Disease: A Sociological and Action Perspective, in: id.: Action Theory and the Human Condition, New York: Free Press 1978, pp.66-81, p.70.

[7] Parsons erklärt diesen Zwang psychoanalytisch aus der spezifischen Familienstruktur der westlichen Gesellschaften. (Talcott Parsons: Definitions of Health and Illness in the Light of American Values and Social Structure, in: id.: Social Structure and Personality, Glencoe: Free Press 1964, pp.257-91, p.286. und Talcott Parsons: Psychoanalysis and the Social Structure, in: id.: Essays in Sociological Theory (Revised Edition), Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press 1958, pp.336-47, p.345.)

[8] Parsons: The Social System, loc.cit., p.436sq.

[9] Talcott Parsons: Some Theoretical Considerations Bearing on the Field of Medical Sociology, in: id.: Social Structure and Personality, Glencoe Ill.: Free Press 1964, pp.325-58, p.340sq.

[10] Parsons: Social System, loc.cit., p.438sq.

[11] Parsons: The Sick Role and the Role of the Physician Reconsidered, loc.cit., p.32.

[12] Herzlich: Health and Illness, loc.cit., p.114sqq.

[13] Bereits Mitte der 1960er  weist er in der Vergangenheitsform darauf hin, daß man davon ausgegangen war, daß Krankheit nicht Teil der conditio humana sei, sondern kontrollierbar und letztlich sogar endgültig zu besiegen ( Some Theoretical Considerations … loc.cit., p.337.)

[14] Niklas Luhmann: Der medizinische Code, in id.: Soziologische Aufklärung 5. Konstruktivistische Perspektiven, Opladen: Westdeutscher Verlag 1990, pp.183-95, p.186sq.

[15] Talcott Parsons: Health and Disease: A Sociological and Action Perspective, loc.cit., p.68. Gesundheit als teleonomische Fähigkeit sei so “… the capacity to maintain a favorable, self-regulated state that is a prerequisite of the effective performance of an indefinitely wide range of functions both within the system and in relation to its environments.” (ibid. p.69.)

[16] Herzlich: Health and Illness. loc.cit., p.78.

[17] Hans-Ulrich Deppe: Zur geschichtlichen Dimension in der Medizinischen Soziologie, in:  Id., H.-U. Deppe, M. Regus (ed.): Seminar: Medizin, Gesellschaft, Geschichte. Beiträge zur Entwicklungsgeschichte der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1975, pp.11-28 – ebenso wie ungesundes Leben aus den kapitalistischen Produktionsverhältnissen abgeleitet wurde…

[18] Uta Gerhardt: Idealtypische Analyse von Statusbiographien bei chronisch Kranken, in: id.: Gesellschaft und Gesundheit. Begründung der Medizinsoziologie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1991, pp.9-60, p.12.

[19] Claudine Herzlich, Janine Pierret: Illness and Self in Society, Baltimore und London: John Hopkins University Press 1987, p.210.

[20] Gerhardt hat deshalb zurecht darauf hingewiesen, daß der Vorwurf, Parsons habe chronische Krankheiten ignoriert, auf mangelnder Kenntnis seiner Texte beruht. (Uta Gerhard: Rollentheorie und gesundheitsbezogene Interaktion … loc.cit., p.181.)

[21] Talcott Parsons: The Sick Role and the Role of the Physician Reconsidered, loc.cit., p.18sq.

[22] Strauss, Glaser: Chronic Illness, loc.cit. , p.9.

[23] Für einen Überblick cf. Kathy Charmaz: Experiencing Chronic Illness, in: G.L. Albrecht, R. Fitzpatrick, S.C. Scrimshaw (eds): Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine, London: SAGE 2000, pp.277-92.

[24] Strauss, Glaser: Chronic Illness, loc.cit.

[25] Kathy Charmaz: Loss of Self: A Fundamental Form of Suffering in the Chronically Ill, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.5 (1983), pp.168-95.

[26] Ray Jobling: The Experience of Psoriasis Under Treatment, in: R. Anderson, M. Bury (eds): Living with Chronic Illness. The Experience of Patients and their Families, London: Unwin Hyman 1988

[27] Bury unterscheidet mehrere Bedeutungen von “Normalisierung”, einmal das “Ausklammern” der Krankheit in alltäglichen Leben – also so zu leben, als sei man gesund – zum anderen die Integration des Regimes und der Krankheit überhaupt in ein “normales” Leben und in die Identität der Betroffenen. (Michael Bury: The Sociology of Chronic Illness: A Review of Research and Prospects, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.13 (1991), pp.451-68, p.460sq.)

[28] Strauss, Glaser: Chronic Illness, loc.cit., p.58.

[29] Uta Gerhard: Patientenkarrieren. Eine medizinsoziologische Studie, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1986, p.324.

[30] Von daher ist es auch nur teilweise richtig, chronische Krankheit als Idealtyp für Krankheit heute schlechthin zu sehen.

[31] Strauss, Glaser: Chronic Illness, loc.cit., p.21sqq.

[32] Bury: Sociology of Chronic Illness, loc.cit., p.459, Strauss, Glaser: Chronic Illness, loc.cit.,    p.21.

[33] Rose Laub Coser: Complexity of roles as a Seedbed of Individual Autonomy, in: Lewis A. Coser (ed.): The Idea of Social Structure. Papers in Honor of Robert K. Merton, New York/Chicago/San Francisco/ Atlanta: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1975, pp.237-263.

[34] e.g. in: Gerhard: Patientenkarrieren, loc.cit., p.317sqq.

[35] Bury: Sociology of Chronic Illness, loc.cit., p.459sq.

[36] Luhmann: Der medizinische Code, loc.cit., p.194.

[37] Darauf weist Gerhardt angesichts der medizinkritischen Vorstellung einer völligen Emanzipation von der ärztlichen Betreuung durch Selbsthilfegruppen hin. (Gerhard: Patientenkarrieren. loc.cit., p.333sqq.)

[38] Dafür, daß diese nicht in dem Maße verfügbar sind wie die Medizin annimmt cf. Michael Calnan, Simon Williams: Style of Life and Salience of Health: An Exploratory Study of Health Related Practices in Households from Differing Socio-Economic Circumstances, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.13 (1991), pp.506-29, und: Simon J. Williams: Theorising Class, Health and Lifestyles: Can Bourdieu Help Us?, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.17 (1995), pp.577-604.

[39] Georg Vobruba: Prävention durch Selbstkontrolle, in: M.M. Wambach (ed.): Der Mensch als Risiko, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1983, pp.29-48. Hagen Kühn: Healthismus. Eine Analyse der Präventionspolitik und Gesundheitsförderung in den U.S.A., Berlin: Edition Sigma 1993.

[40] Robert Crawford: Healthism and the Medicalization of Everyday Life, in: International Journal of Health Services Vol.10 (1980), pp.365-88.

[41] Hagen Kühn: Eine neue Gesundheitsmoral? Anmerkungen zur lebensstilbezogenen Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung, in: W. Schlicht, H.H. Dickhuth (eds.): Gesundheit für alle. Fiktion oder Realität? Schorndorf: Hoffmann / Stuttgart: Schattauer 1999, pp.205-24.

[42] Luhmann: Der medizinische Code, loc.cit., p.190.

[43] ibid., p.193.

[44] Gerd Marstedt, Ulrich Mergner: Chronische Krankheit und Rehabilitation: Zur institutionellen Regulierung von Statuspassagen, in: L. Leisering, B. Geisler, U. Mergner, U. Raber-Kleberg (eds.): Moderne Lebensläufe im Wandel, Weinheim: Deutscher Studien Verlag 1993, pp. 221-48, p.244.

[45] Susan Sontag: Illness as a Metaphor, London: Allen Lane 1979, cf. auch Monica Greco: Psychosomatic Subjects and the ‘Duty to Be Well’: Personal Agency within Medical Rationality, in: Economy & Society, Vol.22 (1993), pp.357-72.

[46] Irving Kenneth Zola: Medicine as an Institution of Social Control, in: P. Conrad, R. Kern (eds): The Sociology of Health and Illness. Critical Perspectives, New York: St. Martin’s 1981, pp.511-27, p.514.

[47] cf. Heidi Marie Rimke: Governing Citizens through Self-help Literature, in: Cultural Studies Vol.14 (2000), pp.61-78.

[48] Frank Lettke, Willy H. Eirmbter, Alois Hahn, Claudia Hennes, Rüdiger Jacob: Krankheit und Gesellschaft. Zur Bedeutung von Krankheitsbildern und Gesundheitsvorstellungen für die Prävention, Konstanz: Universitätsverlag Konstanz 1999, p.16sq.

[49] ibid., p.14sq.

[50] Gina Kolata: Days Off Are Not Allowed, Weight Experts Argue, in: The New York Times, October 18, 2000.

[51] Herzlich: Health and Illness, loc.cit., p.101sq.

[52] Michel Foucault: Governmentality, in: G. Burchell, C. Gordon, P. Miller (eds.): The Foucault Effect. Studies in Governmentality, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf 1991, pp.87-104, cf. auch Michel Foucault: The Political Technology of Individuals, in: L.H. Martin, H. Gutman, P.H. Hutton (eds.): Technologies of the Self. A Seminar with Michel Foucault, London: Tavistock 1988, pp.145-62., p.152.

[53] Thomas Lemke: Neoliberalismus, Staat und Selbsttechnologien. Ein kritischer Überblick über die governmentality studies, in: Politische Vierteljahresschrift, Vol.41 (2000), No.1, pp.31-47, p.38.

[54] Nikolas Rose: Governing the Soul. The Shaping of the Private Self, London / New York: Routledge 1990, p.224.

[55] Michel Foucault: Afterword. The Subject and Power, in: H.L. Dreyfus, P. Rabinow: Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1983, pp.208-26, p.214sqq.

[56] Foucault: Governmentality, loc.cit., p.100.

[57] Nikolas Rose: Government, Authority and Expertise in Advanced Liberalism, in: Economy and Society, Vol.22 (1993), pp.287-299, p.285sq.

[58] ibid., p.291.

[59] Simon J. Williams: Chronic illness as biographical disruption or biographical disruption as chronic illness? Reflections on a core concept, in: Sociology of Health & Illness, Vol.22 (2000), pp.40-67.

[60] Rosalind Coward: The Whole Truth. The Myth of Alternative Health, London/Boston: Faber 1989.

[61] Sarah Nettleton: Governing the Risky Self. How to Become Healthy, Wealthy and Wise, in: A: Petersen, R. Bunton (eds.): Foucault, Health and Medicine, London: Routledge 1997, pp.207-22, p.214sq.

[62] Robert Castel: From Dangerousness to Risk, in: G. Burchell, C. Gordon, P. Miller (eds.): The Foucault Effect. Studies in Governmentality, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf 1991, pp.281-98.

[63] Hierin erweist sich nochmals die Angewiesenheit der Regierung auf Wissen um ihre Subjekte. Wirkungslose und schädliche Maßnahmen werden relativ schnell identifiziert.

[64]  Nettleton: Governing the Risky Self, loc.cit., p.216.

[65] Alan Warde: Consumption, Food, and Taste, London: Sage 1997, pp.78-91.

[66] “the treat by its existence defines the rest of shopping for the shopper as not a treat, i.e. as directed to necessity, to moderation and as on behalf of some larger entity.” (Daniel Miller: A Theory of Shopping, Cambridge: Polity 1998, p.40.)

[67]  Stephen Mennell: On the Civilizing of Appetite, in: M. Featherstone, M. Hepworth, B.S. Turner (eds): The Body: Social Process and Cultural Theory, London: Sage 1991.

[68] Nikolas Rose, Peter Miller: Political power beyond the State: problematics of government, in: British Journal of Sociology, Vol.43 (1992), pp.173-205, p.201.

[69] Mary Douglas: How Institutions Think, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul 1986.

[70] Lemke: Neoliberalismus, Staat und Selbsttechnologien, loc.cit., p.42.

[71] Barry Glassner: Fit for Postmodern Selfhood, in: H. S. Becker, M. McCall (Hrsg.): Symbolic Interaction and Cultural Studies, Chicago und London: University of Chicago Press 1990, pp.215-43, p. 219. (Hervorhebung von mir.)

[72] Anthony Giddens: Power, the dialectic of control and class structuration, in: id., G. Mackenzie: Social Class and the Division of  Labour. Essays in Honour of Ilya Neustadt, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1982, pp.29-45.

[73] Nettleton: Governing the Risky Self, loc.cit., 218sqq.

[74] Glassner: Fit for Postmodern Selfhood, loc.cit., p.221.

[75] Ivan Illich: Medical Nemesis. The Expropriation of Health, London: Calder & Boyars 1975, p.91.

[76] Deborah Lupton: Foucault and the Medicalisation Critique, in: A. Peterson, R. Bunton (eds): Foucault, Health and Medicine, London: Routledge 1997, pp.94-110, p.107.

[77] Cf. e.g. die Weise, wie Rose den Übergang von wohlfahrtsstaatlichen zu fortgeschrittenen Regierungstechniken erklärt. Die Regierenden sind damit konfrontiert, daß sie nicht mehr direkt in das Leben der Individuen hineinregieren können (bei der Distanzierung der Regierung handelt es sich also nicht schlicht um einen Kniff, sondern das Ergebnis von Widerstand…) und sind andererseits mit Prozessen konfrontiert, die sie mangels Wissen nicht steuern können. Neoliberale Regierung “auf Distanz” ist die Lösung dieses Problems. (Rose: Government, Authority and Expertise in Advanced Liberalism, loc.cit.)

[78] Auch wenn “Protestmoral” meist gerade hier ihren schwachen Punkt hat. Cf. Wolfgang Krohn: Funktionen der Moralkommunikation, in: Soziale Systeme, Vol.5 (1999), pp.313-38, p.332.

[79] Foucault: Afterword. loc.cit., p.211.

[80] Lemke: Neoliberalismus, loc.cit., p.41.

[81] Barbara Cruikshank: Revolutions Within: Self-Government and Self-Esteem, in: A. Bury, Th. Osborne, N. Rose (eds): Foucault and Political Reason. Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and Rationalities of Government, London: UCL Press 1996, pp.231-51.

[82] So im Interview mit Dreyfus und Rabinow (On the Genealogy of Ethics, in: H. L. Dreyfus, P. Rabinow: Michel Foucault. Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics, 2nd Edition, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1983, pp.229-52, p.231sq.)

[83] Rose: Government, Authority and Expertise in Advanced Liberalism, loc.cit., p.297sq.

[84] Foucault: Afterword. loc.cit., p.212.

[85] cf. die Kritik von Lupton (Foucault and the Medicalisation Critique, loc.cit.)

[86] Patrick Hutton: Foucault, Freud and the Technologies of the Self, in: L.H. Martin, H. Gutman, P.H. Hutton: (eds): Technologies of the Self. A Seminar with Michel Foucault, London: Tavistock 1988, pp.121-44.

[87] So sprechen Rose und Miller von der Installation selbstregulativer Techniken in den Bürgern, die deren persönliche Wahl auf die Ziele der Regierung ausrichtet. (Political Power Beyond the State, loc.cit., p.188sq.)

[88] “We do not live in a governed world so much as a world traversed by the ‘will to govern’, fuelled by the constant registration of ‘failure’, the discrepancy between ambition and outcome, and the constant injunction to do better next time.” (Rose/Miller, Political Power…, loc.cit., p.191.)

[89] Doch auch mit dieser Erweiterung bleibt im Foucaultschen Ansatz die Möglichkeit verlegt, diese Technologien des Selbst aus einer konstruktivistischen oder gar realistisch-konstruktivistischen Perspektive in einer Theorie der Subjektivität zu verankern, da eine solche von vornherein unter dem Verdacht stünde, selbst Teil der Konstruktion von herrschaftsförmiger Subjektivität sein. Cf. Hutton: Foucault, Freud and the Technologies of the Self, loc.cit.

[90] Eliot Freidson: Der Ärztestand : berufs- und wissenschaftssoziologische Durchleuchtung einer Profession, Stuttgart : Enke 1979.

[91] So zum Beispiel: Deppe: Zur geschichtlichen Dimension in der Medizinischen Soziologie, loc.cit.

[92]  Anthony Giddens: Modernity and Self-Identity. Self and Society in the Late Modern Age, Cambridge: Polity Press 1991, p.224sqq.

[93] Rimke: Governing Citizens through Self-help Literature, loc.cit., p.68.

[94]So stellt e.g. Cruikshank Selbstachtung als gouvernementales Konstrukt dar, impliziert aber gleichzeitig, daß das Angebot, Selbstachtung zu erlangen, den Subjekten als ein attraktives erscheint.(Revolutions Within, loc.cit.)

[95] Kühn: Healthismus. loc.cit., p.21.

[96] Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno: Dialektik der Aufklärung, Frankfurt am Main: S.Fischer 1969.

[97] Nicholas Abercrombie: The Privilege of the Producer, in: R. Keat, N. Abercrombie (eds): Enterprise Culture, London: Routledge 1990, pp.171-85.

[98] Für einen Überblick cf. Don Slater: Consumer Culture and Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press 1997.

[99] Colin Campbell: The Romantic Ethic and the Spirit of Modern Consumerism, Oxford: Blackkwell 1987, p.76.

[100] Jean Baudrillard: La société de consommation. Ses mythes, ses structures, Paris: Denoël 1970. Entgegen der postmodernen Mythologie von der Ablösung der Gebrauchswerte durch Zeichenwerte (so Scott Lash, John Urry: Economies of Signs and Spaces, London: SAGE 1994, p.14) ist darauf aufmerksam zu machen, daß auch bei Marx schon der Gebrauchswert nicht an einen objektiv feststellbaren Nutzen gekoppelt war, sondern an menschliche Bedürfnisse. “Die Natur dieser Bedürfnisse, ob sie z.B. dem Magen oder der Phantasie entspringen, ändert nichts an der Sache.” (Karl Marx: Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Erster Band, Hamburg 1867, MEGA II,5, 1,  Berlin 1983, p.17.)

[101] Wolfgang Fritz Haug: Kritik der Warenästhetik, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1971.

[102] Campbell: Romantic Ethic, loc.cit., p.153.

[103] Cf. auch Herzlich: Health and Illness. loc.cit., p.101.

[104] Jürgen von Troschke: Das Rauchen. Genuß und Risiko, Basel: Birkhäuser 1987.

[105] Es ist dieses Dilemma, das durch das “Ritual der Gesundheitsförderung” in den Griff bekommen werden soll (Robert Crawford: The Ritual of Health Promotion, in: S.J. Williams, J. Gabe, M. Calnan (eds): Health, Medicine and Society. Key Theories, Future Agendas, London / New York: Routledge 2000, pp.219-35).

[106] Coward: The Whole Truth. loc.cit., p.31.

[107] Deborah Lupton: Food, Risk, and Subjectivity, in: S.J. Williams, J. Gabe, M. Calnan (eds): Health, Medicine and Society. Key Theories, Future Agendas, London / New York: Routledge 2000, pp.205-18, p.210sqq.

[108] Wolfgang Fritz Haug:Zur Ästhetik von Manipulation (1963), in: id.: Warenästhetik, Sexualität und Herrschaft. Gesammelte Aufsätze, Frankfurt am Main: Fischer 1972, pp.31-45 über “Vollkorn und Verfolgungsangst”.

[109] Pierre Bourdieu: La distinction, Paris: Minuit 1979.

[110] Williams: Theorising Class, Health and Lifestyles, loc.cit.

[111] Axel Honneth: Die zerrissene Welt der symbolischen Formen. zum kultursoziogischen Werk Pierre Bourdieus, in: Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie Vol.36 (1984), pp.147-64, p.162.

[112] Williams: Chronic Illness as Biographical Disruption…, loc.cit.

[113] Sontag: Illness as a Metaphor, loc.cit., p.46.

[114] Helmuth Plessner: Die Frage nach der Conditio humana, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1962, p.66.

[115] Monica Greco: Homo Vacuus. Alexithymie und das neoliberale Gebot des Selbstseins, in: U. Bröckling, S. Krasmann, Th. Lemke (eds): Gouvernementalität der Gegenwart. Studien zur Ökonomisierung des Sozialen, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 2000, p.265-85.

[116] Charmaz: Loss of Self, loc.cit.

[117] Herzlich, Pierret: Illness and Self in Society, loc.cit., p.31.

[118] Sontag: Illness as a Metaphor, loc.cit., p.28.

[119] Edgar Heim: Krankheit als Krise und Chance, Stuttgart/Berlin: Kreuz Verlag 1980, p.187. Schon in der romantischen Vorstellung wurde die Idee formuliert, daß “people are made more conscious as they confront their deaths.” (Sontag, loc.cit. p.30.)

[120] Dietrich von Engelhardt: Mit der Krankheit leben. Grundlagen und Perspektiven der Copingstruktur des Patienten, Heidelberg: Verlag für Medizin Dr. Ewald Fischer 1986, p.98. (Hervorhebung von mir, M.Z.V.)

[121] ibid., p.98.

[122] “Krankheit soll das Verhältnis zur Umwelt nicht vollständig bestimmen; es gilt, die immer noch vorhandenen gesunden Momente in sich zu erkennen und zu stärken.” (ibid., p.102).

[123] ibid., p.144.

[124] ibid., p.98. Der distanzierte Gestus ist bezeichnend: die Kranken “sehen zwar die Einschränkungen und Belastungen” – als hätten sie die Möglichkeit sie zu übersehen!

[125] Website der Kurverwaltung Bad Neuenahr http://www.bad-neuenahr-online.de/medizin/tcm.htm, retrieved 5. September 2001.

[126] Beispielsweise von der Kraichgau-Klinik, einer Fachklinik für Rehabilitation und Präventivmedizin, die in ihrem onkologischen Betreuungskonzept schreibt: “Krankheit als Chance: Krankheit kann auch als Krise begriffen werden, aus der Betroffene mit gestärkter Persönlichkeit und reiferer Einstellung zu ihrer Existenz hervorgehen. Diesen positiven Aspekt der Krankheit versuchen wir ebenso herauszuarbeiten wie das Konzept der ‘Salutogenese’: Wie können wir heilsame Kräfte mobilisieren und stabilisieren? Was bedeutet ‘Heilsein’ für den Einzelnen? Durch die Reflexion persönlicher Ziele kommt es oft zur positiven Neuorientierung und mehr Lebensmut.” http://www.kraichgau-klinik.de/onkokonz.htm , retr. 5. September 2001.

[127] So etwa die Bestseller von Rüdiger Dahlke “Krankheit als Weg”, “Krankheit als Sprache der Seele, Be-Deutung und Chance der Krankheitsbilder”,  “Lebenskrisen als Entwicklungschancen. Zeiten des Umbruchs und ihre Krankheitsbilder” und “Gewichtsprobleme. Be- Deutung und Chance von Übergewicht und Untergewicht”.

[128] Michael P. Kelly, David Field: Conceptualising Chronic Illness, in: D. Field, S. Taylor (eds): Sociological Perspectives on Health, Illness and Health Care, Oxford: Blackwell 1998, pp.3-20, p.15sqq. Zudem läßt sich dem mit Williams entgegenhalten, daß chronische Krankheit in aller Regel rein quantitativ einen viel tieferen Einschnitt bedeutet, als die heutigen erwerbs- und familienbiographischen Brüche. (Williams: Chronic Illness as Biographical Disruption…, loc.cit.)